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Dementia

Vitamin B12 May Slow Brain Aging/Dementia

No one wants their brain to shrink as they get older, but this is exactly what happens in the aging process – and the faster it shrinks, the greater the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive impairment. As such, I think you’ll find this Lifestyle Medicine Update really fascinating.

Eating citrus fruits lowers risk of dementia by 23 percent, study finds

New research is indicating that eating more oranges, grapefruits and other citrus fruits could help to offset the effects of age-related cognitive impairment and dementia. The research was conducted by scientists at Tohuku University in Japan.

Elevated homocysteine levels increase risk of heart disease, stroke and dementia

Heart disease, the leading cause of death in the nation, claims over 610,000 lives a year in the United States. Stroke exacts a grim toll as well, killing over 130,000 people. And, over 5 million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. Recent studies suggest that one specific factor – elevated blood levels of a substance known as homocysteine – may be behind this trio of devastating conditions.

The Evolution of Amyloid Toxicity in Alzheimer’s

Neuroscience News, March 1, 2016
Researchers uncover structural markers to differentiate between smaller and larger forms of “Jekyll and Hyde” amyloid beta molecular bundles–providing a basis for understanding why smaller bundles of the protein are more toxic than larger bundles.

Where are the Lowest Rates of Alzheimer’s in the World?

Michael Greger M.D., November 12th, 2015
The rates of dementia differ greatly around the world, from the lowest rates in Africa, India, and South Asia, to the highest rates in Western Europe and especially North America.

6 Common Myths About Aging

<strong><h5><p>For instance, studies on the brains of elderly people with and without dementia find significant blood vessel damage in those with hypertension. Such damage shrinks the amount of healthy brain tissue you have in reserve, reducing the amount available if a disease like Alzheimer's hits, Dr. Powers says.</strong></h5></p>