SUBSCRIBE BY RSS rss feed | EMAIL
Natural Solutions Radio header image

Large Study Says Calcium May Cut Colon Cancer Risk

Wed Mar 20, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A daily calcium intake of at least 700 milligrams may significantly reduce the risk of developing cancer in the lower part of the colon, according to a new report. But, the authors note, daily calcium intake beyond this "relatively moderate" level does not appear to add any further protection against colon cancer.

Vision Loss on the Rise in American Adults

Wed Mar 20, 2002

By Alicia Ault

WASHINGTON (Reuters Health) - As the US population gets older, more Americans than ever before are facing the loss of their vision, a joint private-federal study released Wednesday shows.

Some of this vision loss is preventable, said Dr. Paul A. Sieving, director of the National Eye Institute, in an interview with Reuters Health. "I think the American people should pay attention to periodic eye care," he said.

Many Hysterectomies Unnecessary, UK Study Shows

Wed Mar 20, 2002

LONDON (Reuters) - Thousands of British women who suffer heavy menstrual bleeding are having unnecessary hysterectomies to cure the problem, according to research published Wednesday.

Doctors who studied around half the hysterectomies carried out in England, Wales and Northern Ireland in one year in the mid-1990s found that 46% were performed on women who complained of excessive monthly bleeding.

Topics: 

Smoking Ups Risk for One Type of Leukemia

Tue Mar 19, 2002

By Keith Mulvihill

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Smokers, especially those over the age of 60, are more than twice as likely as nonsmokers to develop a specific type of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), study findings suggest. While smoking has long been thought to be a possible risk factor for AML--the most common type of leukemia diagnosed in adults--the research results have been contradictory. The results of a new study suggest that smoking may contribute to some types of the leukemia, but not others, helping to explain the murky results.

Topics: 

Timber Harvest Destroying Mexican Butterfly Forest

By Cat Lazaroff

WASHINGTON, DC, April 3, 2002 (ENS) - Logging in the Mexican cloud belt forests in which hundreds of millions of monarch butterflies spend the winter has increased, despite decades of legal protection for the forests and the insects. A new study warns that if the timber harvest continues unchecked, most of the monarch's overwintering habitat will be gone within decades.

Photo No. 1
One of nearly a billion monarch butterflies that overwinter in Mexico each year. (Photo by Fulvio Eccardi, courtesy World Wildlife Fund Mexico)

Study Finds Heart Failure Test Accurate

Tue Mar 19, 2002

By Deena Beasley

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Diagnosing congestive heart failure with a blood test by Biosite Inc. that measures levels of a hormone is better than traditional methods like chest X-rays or medical history, researchers said on Tuesday.

Topics: 

Study Finds Heart Failure Test Accurate

Tue Mar 19, 2002

By Deena Beasley

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Diagnosing congestive heart failure with a blood test by Biosite Inc. that measures levels of a hormone is better than traditional methods like chest X-rays or medical history, researchers said on Tuesday.

Topics: 

Study Links Enzyme to Insulin Resistance

Tue Mar 19, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - High blood levels of a naturally occurring compound involved in blood vessel function may be the "missing link" between insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes, and heart disease.

The study findings also suggest drugs that improve insulin sensitivity may reduce levels of the compound, ADMA, and ultimately lower a person's heart disease risk.

Topics: 

Short-sightedness may be tied to refined diet

by Douglas Fox

The food children eat might play as big a role as books and computer screens when it comes to causing short-sightedness.

Diets high in refined starches such as breads and cereals increase insulin levels. This affects the development of the eyeball, making it abnormally long and causing short-sightedness, suggests a team led by Loren Cordain, an evolutionary biologist at Colorado State University in Fort Collins, and Jennie Brand Miller, a nutrition scientist at the University of Sydney.

Topics: