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Pregnancy Weight Gain May Predict Later Obesity

Pregnancy Weight Gain May Predict Later Obesity

October 29, 2001 By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For many women, the battle of the bulge may reach its zenith during pregnancy and after childbirth, but it may not stop there. New study findings show that if women retain the weight gained during pregnancy for even a year after childbirth, they are more likely to remain overweight or obese for at least another year, researchers report.

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Nutrition Bar Labels Often Misleading

Nutrition Bar Labels Often Misleading

October 30, 2001 By Keith Mulvihill

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) -The levels of some ingredients like carbohydrates, sodium and saturated fats in nutrition bars may exceed levels of what is stated on the product's label, according to ConsumerLab.com, a commercial testing company located in White Plains, New York.

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HIV-Positive May Delay Telling Casual Sex Partners

HIV-Positive May Delay Telling Casual Sex Partners

October 30, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Some people with HIV may not tell their sexual partners and family until the disease has progressed, and casual sex partners are the least likely to be told early on, study findings suggest.

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Exercise May Help Patients with Heart Failure

Exercise May Help Patients with Heart Failure

October 30, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Moderate aerobic exercise appears to lower levels of an immune system protein that may contribute to congestive heart failure (CHF), new study findings suggest.

In the study, a group of men with CHF participated in an exercise program at a rehabilitation center supervised by instructors specializing in cardiac rehabilitation. After the 3-month program, the men had significantly lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, a protein that helps trigger inflammation.

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<b>FDA Announces New Restrictions on Acne Drug

FDA Announces New Restrictions on Acne Drug

October 31, 2001 By Ori Twersky

WASHINGTON (Reuters Health) - Women taking Hoffmann-La Roche Inc.'s popular acne treatment Accutane (isotretinoin) will soon have to submit to new restrictions aimed at preventing unwanted pregnancies while on the drug.

<b>Heart Problems May Be Cause of Some Seniors' Falls

Heart Problems May Be Cause of Some Seniors' Falls

November 1, 2001 By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Unexplained falls among the elderly may not simply be due to aging. Rather, the falls may be a sign of an unrecognized heart problem, British researchers suggest.

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Age, Poverty Affect Birth Weight More in U.S. Blacks

Age, Poverty Affect Birth Weight More in U.S. Blacks

November 1, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - African-American women are nearly four times as likely as white women to have very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and this risk is increased as these women age, according to a report.

VLBW infants weigh less than 3.3 pounds at birth. They are less likely to survive, much more likely to be born prematurely, and more likely than infants of normal weight to have developmental problems. Moderately low birth weight (MLBW) infants weigh between 3.3 and 5.5 pounds.

<b>Repeated Concussions Take a Toll on the Brain

Repeated Concussions Take a Toll on the Brain

November 2, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Getting back into the game soon after sustaining a concussion could leave athletes vulnerable to further head injury, and potential problems down the road, new research suggests.

<b>Smoking Delays Pregnancy

Smoking Delays Pregnancy

October 31, 2001

LONDON (Reuters Health) - Women who continue smoking while trying to have a baby risk having to wait significantly longer to get pregnant, according to study findings released on Wednesday.

Researchers at the Institute of Health Sciences at Oxford University compared the time taken to conceive by 569 women smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers.

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Aspirin Reduces Risk of Pregnancy Complication

Aspirin Reduces Risk of Pregnancy Complication

October 31, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Low doses of aspirin appear to reduce the risk of preeclampsia, a life-threatening condition in which blood pressure rises to dangerous levels in pregnant women.

"Based on our findings and the established safety of aspirin...treatment with aspirin in women who are found to have (abnormal ultrasound results) seems reasonable," conclude the authors conclude lead author Dr. Aravinthan Coomarasamy of the Birmingham Women's Hospital in the UK and colleagues.

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