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Nutritional Supplementation For Cancer, Part 1

Stephen Byrnes, PhD, RNCP

April 19, 2001

Unfortunately, there is no magic supplement regime you can embark on to either prevent or treat cancer. However, there is sufficient evidence that certain nutrients, phytochemicals, fatty acids, hormones, and enzymes can play a major role.

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Alzheimer's May Be Linked to Body Shape

Alzheimer's May Be Linked to Body Shape

October 25, 2001 By Emma Hitt, PhD

ATLANTA (Reuters Health) - Alzheimer's disease may be more common among people with a relatively small waist but sizable hips than among people with the opposite proportions, researchers suggest.

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Cement Injections Ease Pain of Fractured Vertebrae

Cement Injections Ease Pain of Fractured Vertebrae

October 26, 2001 By Merritt McKinney

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Spinal injections of acrylic cement can reduce the pain of fractured vertebrae without surgery, according to the results of a study.

The study's authors suggest that it may be possible to stave off some fractures by injecting the cement into damaged vertebrae that have not yet collapsed.

Heroin Prescription May Help Addicts: Study

Heroin Prescription May Help Addicts: Study

October 26, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Providing heroin addicts with limited amounts of the drug may help some reach the goal of abstinence when other addiction treatments have failed, Swiss researchers report.

Vitamin E Doesn't Prevent Osteoarthritis Pain

Vitamin E Doesn't Prevent Osteoarthritis Pain

October 26, 2001 By Emma Hitt, PhD

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The antioxidant vitamin E does not appear to relieve the pain of osteoarthritis (OA), according to new research findings.

Osteoarthritis is a progressive deterioration in the cartilage of certain joints, including the knee and vertebrae. Unlike rheumatoid arthritis, which is an inherited autoimmune disease, osteoarthritis results from overuse of joints, and can be a byproduct of strenuous sports, obesity or aging.

Low-Impact Exercise May Boost Women's Bone Mass

Low-Impact Exercise May Boost Women's Bone Mass

October 29, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Aerobic exercise can increase women's bone density, and it need not be a high-impact regimen to work, new research shows.

In fact, experts' recommendations for general health--walking for about 30 minutes a day, a few days a week--is enough to lend the bones a hand, George A. Kelley, of the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions in Boston, told Reuters Health.

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Study Looks at Asthma, Obesity Link

Study Looks at Asthma, Obesity Link

October 29, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In the ongoing debate over the relationship between obesity and asthma, new study findings suggest that adolescents with asthma are no more likely to be obese than their non-asthmatic peers.

The study, which included primarily African-American adolescents, seems to counter previous studies that found a link between the two conditions.

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Child's Post-Traumatic Stress Differs From Adult's

Child's Post-Traumatic Stress Differs From Adult's

October 29, 2001

HONOLULU (Reuters Health) - Children who have been diagnosed with depression or anxiety may actually be experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a New York physician said here at the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

Vitamin C Shows Promise in Heart Failure Patients

Vitamin C Shows Promise in Heart Failure Patients

October 29, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Therapy with vitamin C may help heart failure patients by improving the function of their blood vessels, results from a small study suggest.

However, researchers say it is too early to recommend the vitamin as a treatment for congestive heart failure.

Risky Sex Less Likely for Religious Teens: Report

Risky Sex Less Likely for Religious Teens: Report

October 29, 2001 By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Sexually active African-American girls who attend church frequently, pray and partake in other religious activities may be less likely to engage in sexually risky behavior than their less religious peers, new study findings suggest.

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