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FAQ; I have Breast Cance; Ask the Expert

I am 49 years old and had breast cancer diagnosed last Dec. I had a lumpectomy and

14 lymph nodes removed. One out of the 14 nodes had cancer in it. I received chemotherapy and radiation and because the cancer was Estrogen Receptor Positive and I am Post Menopausal I was prescribed tamoxifen. I have been on it for over 6 months now and am interested in replacing it with a natural remedy such as Natural Progesterone Cream. My question to you is would the Natural Progesterone along with Soy Products be a good replacement for the tamoxifen and do you have any information on the success of these products on Post Menopausal women who have had Breast Cancer and would like to find a natural way of having an "Anti-Estrogen" to take. Can you help with sources of Natural Progesterone Cream as well? -- Maureen 

Dear Maureen, There is growing evidence to support the use of many natural products that block the estrogen receptors as well as or better than tamoxifen and with far fewer side effects. The following is a list of these natural approaches: Diet

Red meat, chicken, and dairy products contain foreign estrogens and pesticide residues. Many other petrochemical compounds with estrogenic properties are consumed in the food that is given to these animals and are subsequently concentrated in the milk and fat of the meat. These exogenous estrogens are then deposited in our fatty tissues and on estrogen and progesterone receptors where they are known to interfere in the proper utilization and production of progesterone & estrogen. The message here is to keep animal products in the diet to a minimum.

The ideal diet to follow for breast cancer prevention is:

High fiber, low fat (15% of cals.)

Vegetarian (ORGANIC, fresh, unrefined) vegetables, (grains, beans, nuts, seeds, lentils), fruits, esp. GARLIC, onions, kelp, flax oil, extra virgin olive oil unheated, apples, ginger, soy products, green tea, spelt, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, apricots, cantaloupe, carrots, millet, pink grapefruit, yogurt, etc.

Avoid highly allergenic foods: milk, eggs, wheat, corn, pork, beef, citrus, peanuts, chocolate, etc.

Eat 50-75% of food raw; steam cooking next best and drink 6-10 glasses of pure water daily

Eliminate salt, food additives, smoked and pickled foods

Use anti-oxidant supplements (coenzyme Q10, carotenoids, vitamins E & C, proanthocyanidins, selenium, zinc, etc.)

Don’t smoke

Avoid alcohol, coffee, tea, chocolate

"Good" Estrogens

Soy products contain phytoestrogens (genistein), which have a higher affinity for estrogen receptors than "bad" estrogens and have been demonstrated to have protective influences against endometrial & breast cancer. Soy products and other phytoestrogens work because they, like tamoxifen, successfully block the binding of harmful xenoestrogens at the estrogen receptors.

Dietary Fiber

Whole psyllium seed husks, powdered flax seed, guar gum and a variety of brans have a binding effect on toxins in the colon, as well as harmful forms of estrogen metabolites and cholesterol. They are thus able to assist in the rapid excretion of these materials, thereby blocking their reabsorption into the bloodstream. The omega-3 fatty acids have strong anti-cancer effects. Flax seed has phytoestrogens called lignans, which have been linked to breast cancer prevention.

Iodine

Iodine, along with selenium, zinc and copper are important minerals for optimal thyroid function. There is, statistically speaking, an association between hypothyroidism (low thyroid function) and breast cancer. It is also well known that iodine supplementation reduces or eliminates benign breast cysts thought to be precursors to breast cancer. The best source for iodine and other trace minerals is from sea vegetables like kelp, dulse, nori or kombu. Two tablespoons of dried sea vegetables daily (or 6 compressed kelp tablets) will help boost thyroid function.

Natural Progesterone

Studies suggest that many forms of breast cancer are caused by a deficiency of progesterone. Abnormal breast cancer cell proliferation can be inhibited by topical progesterone cream. The following are some of the many benefits of the use of natural progesterone cream:

1.Helps Use Fat for Energy

2.Facilitates Thyroid Hormone Action

3.Natural Anti-depressant

4.Natural Diruetic

5.Normalizes Blood Sugar Levels

6.Restores Proper Cell Oxygen Levels

7.Restores Libido

8.Normalizes Zinc & Copper Levels

9.Normalizes Blood Clotting

10.Protects Against Breast Fibrocysts

11.Helps Prevent Breast Cancer

12.Helps Prevent Endonmetrial Cancer

13.Necessary for Survival of Embryo

14.Maintains Secretory Endometrium

15.Stimulates Osteoblasts (Bone Building)

16.Precursor for Cortisone Production (Arthritis)

Progesterone is very well absorbed transdermally (the lower abdomen, hips, buttocks, thighs and breasts on a rotational basis) where it is stored in the fatty tissues for use as needed and unlike progesterone taken orally, it is not subject to being intercepted by the liver. For those women who are especially deficient in progesterone, it may take two to three months to restore optimal levels. There are no reports of any significant side effects but a few women may experience temporary incidental spotting and/or swelling of the breasts. This stops within 1 to 3 month with the normalizing of hormone levels. You can obtain natural progesterone cream in Canada by asking your doctor for a prescription which can be filled by a compounding pharmacist (one who makes up the cream from the basic raw ingredients).

Melatonin

Scientists at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans grew human breast cancer cells in the laboratory and then added melatonin to some of the cultures. They found that estrogen-receptor-positive cells treated with melatonin grew one-fourth to one-half as fast as untreated cells did. The fewer estrogen receptors a batch of cancer cells had, the more melatonin it took to retard their growth. The hormone had no effect on cancer cells that lacked estrogen receptors.

"Melatonin may be a naturally occurring anticancer compound," said Dr. Steven Hill. "The more a breast cancer is estrogen receptor positive, the more dramatic the response may be." Melatonin appears to work in a very novel way, by somehow decreasing the number of estrogen receptors the cells have, which in turn cuts the amount of tumor-promoting estrogen that enters them. The usual amount of melatonin reported in studies on its use in breast cancer is 20 mg. daily.

For more information on melatonin and other natural breast cancer treatments, see the references listed below.

-- Dr. Zoltan Rona

http://www.srvitamins.com

REFERENCES

Austin, Steve and Hitchcock, Cathy. Breast Cancer, What You Should Know (But May Not Be Told) About Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment. Rocklin, CA:Prima Publishing, 1994.

Chang, K.J. et al. Influences of percutaneous administration of estradiol and progesterone on human breast epithelial cell cycle in vivo. Fertility and Sterility 1995; 63:785-791.

Davis, Devra Lee, and Bradlow, H. Leon, Can Environmental Estrogens Cause Breast Cancer? Scientific American, October 1995, p.166

Diamond, Harvey. You Can Prevent Breast Cancer. San Diego:ProMotion Publishing. 1995. 1-800-231-1776.

Elias, Marilyn, The mysteries of melatonin.., Vol. 18, Harvard Health Letter, 06-01-1993, pp 6.

Fischer, William L. How to Fight Cancer & Win. Vancouver: Alive Books, 1988.

Follingstad, A.H. Estriol, the forgotten estrogen? JAMA 239:29-30; 1978.

Lee, John R. Natural Progesterone. Sebastopol, CA:BLL Publishing, 1994.

Lemon, H.M., et al. Reduced estriol excretion in patients with breast cancer prior to endocrine therapy. JAMA 196:1128-1136. 1966.

Lockwood, K. et al. Partial and complete regression of breast cancer in patients in relation to dosage of Coenzyme Q10. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 199, No. 3, 1994. March 30, 1994. pp 1504-1508.

Moss, Ralph W. The Cancer Industry. New York:Paragon House, 1991.

Moss, Ralph W. Cancer Therapy, The Independent Consumer’s Guide to Non-Toxic Treatment & Prevention: New York:Equinox Press, 1993.

Moss, Ralph W. Questioning Chemotherapy. Brooklyn:Equinox Press. 1995.

Reiter, Russel J. and Robinson, Jo. Melatonin, Your Body’s Natural Wonder Drug. New York:Bantam Books, 1995.

Simone, Charles B. Breast Health. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publ. Group. 1995.

Taubes, Gary, Pesticides and Breast Cancer: No Link? Science, Vol. 264, 22 April 1994, p.499.

Weed, Susun S. Breast Cancer? Breast Health! The Wise Woman Way. Woodstock:Ash Tree Publishing. 1996.

 

 

I am 49 years old and had breast cancer diagnosed last Dec. I had a lumpectomy and 14 lymph nodes removed. One out of the 14 nodes had cancer in it. I received chemotherapy and radiation and because the cancer was Estrogen Receptor Positive and I am Post Menopausal I was prescribed tamoxifen. I have been on it for over 6 months now and am interested in replacing it with a natural remedy such as Natural Progesterone Cream. My question to you is would the Natural Progesterone along with Soy Products be a good replacement for the tamoxifen and do you have any information on the success of these products on Post Menopausal women who have had Breast Cancer and would like to find a natural way of having an "Anti-Estrogen" to take. Can you help with sources of Natural Progesterone Cream as well? -- Maureen

 

Dear Maureen, There is growing evidence to support the use of many natural products that block the estrogen receptors as well as or better than tamoxifen and with far fewer side effects. The following is a list of these natural approaches: Diet

Red meat, chicken, and dairy products contain foreign estrogens and pesticide residues. Many other petrochemical compounds with estrogenic properties are consumed in the food that is given to these animals and are subsequently concentrated in the milk and fat of the meat. These exogenous estrogens are then deposited in our fatty tissues and on estrogen and progesterone receptors where they are known to interfere in the proper utilization and production of progesterone & estrogen. The message here is to keep animal products in the diet to a minimum.

The ideal diet to follow for breast cancer prevention is:

High fiber, low fat (15% of cals.)

Vegetarian (ORGANIC, fresh, unrefined) vegetables, (grains, beans, nuts, seeds, lentils), fruits, esp. GARLIC, onions, kelp, flax oil, extra

virgin olive oil unheated, apples, ginger, soy products, green tea, spelt, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, apricots, cantaloupe, carrots, millet, pink grapefruit, yogurt, etc.

Avoid highly allergenic foods: milk, eggs, wheat, corn, pork, beef, citrus, peanuts, chocolate, etc.

Eat 50-75% of food raw; steam cooking next best and drink 6-10 glasses of pure water daily

Eliminate salt, food additives, smoked and pickled foods

Use anti-oxidant supplements (coenzyme Q10, carotenoids, vitamins E & C, proanthocyanidins, selenium, zinc, etc.)

Don’t smoke

Avoid alcohol, coffee, tea, chocolate

"Good" Estrogens

Soy products contain phytoestrogens (genistein), which have a higher affinity for estrogen receptors than "bad" estrogens and have been demonstrated to have protective influences against endometrial & breast cancer. Soy products and other phytoestrogens work because they, like tamoxifen, successfully block the binding of harmful xenoestrogens at the estrogen receptors.

Dietary Fiber

Whole psyllium seed husks, powdered flax seed, guar gum and a variety of brans have a binding effect on toxins in the colon, as well as harmful forms of estrogen metabolites and cholesterol. They are thus able to assist in the rapid excretion of these materials, thereby blocking their reabsorption into the bloodstream. The omega-3 fatty acids have strong anti-cancer effects. Flax seed has phytoestrogens called lignans, which have been linked to breast cancer prevention.

Iodine

Iodine, along with selenium, zinc and copper are important minerals for optimal thyroid function. There is, statistically speaking, an association between hypothyroidism (low thyroid function) and breast cancer. It is also well known that iodine supplementation reduces or eliminates benign breast cysts thought to be precursors to breast cancer. The best source for iodine and other trace minerals is from sea vegetables like kelp, dulse, nori or kombu. Two tablespoons of dried sea vegetables daily (or 6 compressed kelp tablets) will help boost thyroid function.

Natural Progesterone

Studies suggest that many forms of breast cancer are caused by a deficiency of progesterone. Abnormal breast cancer cell proliferation can be inhibited by topical progesterone cream. The following are some of the many benefits of the use of natural progesterone cream:

1.Helps Use Fat for Energy

2.Facilitates Thyroid Hormone Action

3.Natural Anti-depressant

4.Natural Diruetic

5.Normalizes Blood Sugar Levels

6.Restores Proper Cell Oxygen Levels

7.Restores Libido

8.Normalizes Zinc & Copper Levels

9.Normalizes Blood Clotting

10.Protects Against Breast Fibrocysts

11.Helps Prevent Breast Cancer

12.Helps Prevent Endonmetrial Cancer

13.Necessary for Survival of Embryo

14.Maintains Secretory Endometrium

15.Stimulates Osteoblasts (Bone Building)

16.Precursor for Cortisone Production (Arthritis)

Progesterone is very well absorbed transdermally (the lower abdomen, hips, buttocks, thighs and breasts on a rotational basis) where it is stored in the fatty tissues for use as needed and unlike progesterone taken orally, it is not subject to being intercepted by the liver. For those women who are especially deficient in progesterone, it may take two to three months to restore optimal levels. There are no reports of any significant side effects but a few women may experience temporary incidental spotting and/or swelling of the breasts. This stops within 1 to 3 month with the normalizing of hormone levels. You can obtain natural progesterone cream in Canada by asking your doctor for a prescription which can be filled by a compounding pharmacist (one who makes up the cream from the basic raw ingredients).

Melatonin

Scientists at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans grew human breast cancer cells in the laboratory and then added melatonin to some of the cultures. They found that estrogen-receptor-positive cells treated with melatonin grew one-fourth to one-half as fast as untreated cells did. The fewer estrogen receptors a batch of cancer cells had, the more melatonin it took to retard their growth. The hormone had no effect on cancer cells that lacked estrogen receptors.

"Melatonin may be a naturally occurring anticancer compound," said Dr. Steven Hill. "The more a breast cancer is estrogen receptor positive, the more dramatic the response may be." Melatonin appears to work in a very novel way, by somehow decreasing the number of estrogen receptors the cells have, which in turn cuts the amount of tumor-promoting estrogen that enters them. The usual amount of melatonin reported in studies on its use in breast cancer is 20 mg. daily.

For more information on melatonin and other natural breast cancer treatments, see the references listed below.

-- Dr. Zoltan Rona

http://www.srvitamins.com

REFERENCES

Austin, Steve and Hitchcock, Cathy. Breast Cancer, What You Should Know (But May Not Be Told) About Prevention, Diagnosis and Treatment. Rocklin, CA:Prima Publishing, 1994.

Chang, K.J. et al. Influences of percutaneous administration of estradiol and progesterone on human breast epithelial cell cycle in vivo. Fertility and Sterility 1995; 63:785-791.

Davis, Devra Lee, and Bradlow, H. Leon, Can Environmental Estrogens Cause Breast Cancer? Scientific American, October 1995, p.166

Diamond, Harvey. You Can Prevent Breast Cancer. San Diego:ProMotion Publishing. 1995. 1-800-231-1776.

Elias, Marilyn, The mysteries of melatonin.., Vol. 18, Harvard Health Letter, 06-01-1993, pp 6.

Fischer, William L. How to Fight Cancer & Win. Vancouver: Alive Books, 1988.

Follingstad, A.H. Estriol, the forgotten estrogen? JAMA 239:29-30; 1978.

Lee, John R. Natural Progesterone. Sebastopol, CA:BLL Publishing, 1994.

Lemon, H.M., et al. Reduced estriol excretion in patients with breast cancer prior to endocrine therapy. JAMA 196:1128-1136. 1966.

Lockwood, K. et al. Partial and complete regression of breast cancer in patients in relation to dosage of Coenzyme Q10. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, Vol. 199, No. 3, 1994. March 30, 1994. pp 1504-1508.

Moss, Ralph W. The Cancer Industry. New York:Paragon House, 1991.

Moss, Ralph W. Cancer Therapy, The Independent Consumer’s Guide to Non-Toxic Treatment & Prevention: New York:Equinox Press, 1993.

Moss, Ralph W. Questioning Chemotherapy. Brooklyn:Equinox Press. 1995.

Reiter, Russel J. and Robinson, Jo. Melatonin, Your Body’s Natural Wonder Drug. New York:Bantam Books, 1995.

Simone, Charles B. Breast Health. Garden City Park, New York: Avery Publ. Group. 1995.

Taubes, Gary, Pesticides and Breast Cancer: No Link? Science, Vol. 264, 22 April 1994, p.499.

Weed, Susun S. Breast Cancer? Breast Health! The Wise Woman Way. Woodstock:Ash Tree Publishing. 1996.

 


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