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Vitamin D (Cholecalciferol)

Low vitamin D levels linked to depression in children

Are your kids getting enough vitamin D? If not, they could be at a higher risk for depression. A new study from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom shows that children and teens with higher levels of vitamin D are less likely to experience depression than those with lower levels.

Menopausal women do not absorb enough vitamin D

A number of tests carried out by researchers at the Carlos III Institute of Health in Spain has revealed that post-menopausal women may not get enough vitamin D in their diets, which can contribute to a range of dangerous health problems, including abdominal obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease, as well as a number of cancers.

Vitamin D3 does even more than publicized - it enhances mental health

Most of us know that vitamin D3 helps prevent almost anything from flu to cancer by strengthening our immune systems. But little has been publicized about D3's potential for preventing or getting out of depression. Recent studies link D3 deficiencies to depression. And there is some, who speculate how D3's physiological protections directly affect moods.

Vitamin D intake in pregnancy prevents RSV infections in infants

The Journal of Pediatrics published a study that found infants, who are deficient in vitamin D at birth, have a six times higher risk of developing RSV during their first year of life. Nearly 100,000 children under the age of one are hospitalized every single year due to RSV infections.

What Dose of Oral Vitamin D Do You Need to Prevent Cancer?

Researchers have found that daily intakes of vitamin D by adults in the range of 4000-8000 IU are needed to maintain blood levels of vitamin D metabolites in the range needed to reduce by about half the risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, multiple sclerosis, and type 1 diabetes.

Mega-doses of vitamin D help prevent breast cancer and other diseases, study finds

Current government recommendations of 400 or 600 international units (IU) of vitamin D a day are insufficient to prevent serious diseases like breast cancer, a new study published in the journal Anticancer Research has found.