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Marijuana

Cops across America tell federal government to end marijuana prohibition


A cohort of law enforcement officials and long-time law enforcement veterans has had enough of the federal government's continued prohibition of marijuana, and is demanding that the rogue entity back off and respect the people's sovereign right to grow and use the natural plant as they see fit, particularly in the states of Colorado and Washington where oppressive prohibition laws were recently lifted through voter initiatives.

New wave of business opportunities involving medicinal, nutritional marijuana sweep Colorado


New business opportunities abound in the state of Colorado, where Amendment 64 to legalize the recreational sale and use of marijuana was recently passed with flying colors by 1.36 million enthusiastic Colorado voters. An entire sector of the market that was formerly limited to only licensed marijuana dispensaries for approved medical patients, in other words, is set to potentially expand more publicly into things like bakeries that sell cannabis-infused goodies; corner coffee shops that serve joints alongside lattes; and even restaurants that serve meals containing a much different kind of hash.
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Three out of four doctors would prescribe medical marijuana to patients: Study


New York City Mayor Michael "Nanny" Bloomberg thinks medical marijuana is a hoax, but as far as I know he's never been to medical school, which is obvious based on the results of a new survey that found more than three-quarters of physicians would prescribe it to their patients if they could.

How is pot worse than fireworks?


The marijuana regulation law that Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed last month includes a quarter-ounce limit on pot purchases by visitors from other states. Colorado residents, by contrast, may buy up to an ounce at a time. As I have mentioned before, making the purchase limit hinge on residency seems inconsistent with Amendment 64, the marijuana legalization initiative that is now part of Colorado’s constitution. The quarter-ounce rule may also be vulnerable to challenge under the U.S. Constitution, since it discriminates against residents of other states.
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Can Colorado's Limit on Pot Purchases by Nonresidents Survive Constitutional Challenges?


The marijuana regulation law that Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed last month includes a quarter-ounce limit on pot purchases by visitors from other states. Colorado residents, by contrast, may buy up to an ounce at a time. As I have mentioned before, making the purchase limit hinge on residency seems inconsistent with Amendment 64, the marijuana legalization initiative that is now part of Colorado's constitution. The quarter-ounce rule may also be vulnerable to challenge under the U.S. Constitution, since it discriminates against residents of other states.

Marijuana - A cure for cancer?


If you're over 21, marijuana is legal to smoke and have in possession (under 1 ounce) here in the state of Washington. Many users do so for the effects the THC found in marijuana has on the body. THC is the substance in marijuana that gets you "felling high". But recently, through some breakthrough research, studies have shown that the substance Cannabidiol (CBD), also found in marijuana, has the potential to be a game changer in the fight against cancer.

Marijuana dispensaries sue Long Beach police for illegal, unconstitutional actions to put them out of business


We here at Natural News didn't think it would be long after voters in the states of Washington and Colorado approved measures legalizing possession and use of marijuana in November before the lawsuits would start.

Marijuana Legalization: Ending Drug War Will Save America $40 Billion Annually


As the "fiscal cliff" racket in Washington produced a predictable deal and compromised between both parties' favorite pet welfare programs, it was not a surprise that government spending and power took precedence over cutting spending. While someone like me could find trillions to cut in the federal budget, I wanted to offer a modest proposal that would both save money and enhance freedom: abolishing the drug war.