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Longevity

Secret to long life found in 115-year-old woman's blood


In 2005, 115-year-old Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper passed away to old age healthy and disease-free. At the time of her death, Schipper became the oldest person to have her body donated to science. Longevity researchers were interested in understanding why a healthy person suddenly dies of old age. A group of Dutch researchers may be onto something. After researching the woman's stem cells, Dutch researchers, led by Henne Holstege, may have found out why this woman lived disease-free for well over a century and why her body shut down when it did.

Secret to long life found in 115-year-old woman's blood


In 2005, 115-year-old Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper passed away to old age healthy and disease-free. At the time of her death, Schipper became the oldest person to have her body donated to science. Longevity researchers were interested in understanding why a healthy person suddenly dies of old age. A group of Dutch researchers may be onto something. After researching the woman's stem cells, Dutch researchers, led by Henne Holstege, may have found out why this woman lived disease-free for well over a century and why her body shut down when it did.

3 easy habits for a long, disease-free life


Telomeres (tiny bits of DNA that influence longevity and health) have been causing quite a stir among researchers lately --- and for good reason. The length of these protective caps on the end of chromosomes determine how quickly cells age, and how prone we are to having a stroke or developing cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, vascular dementia, diabetes and osteoporosis. Essentially, the shorter your telomeres, the shorter your lifespan. And yet, we don't have to be at the mercy of our genetics. Have a look at the following tips which help foster strong telomeres -- as well as resistance to disease and aging.

Bernando LaPallo of Mesa, Arizona is 112 years young and is happy and healthy too


Do you juice greens with a vegetable juicer and make smoothies with organic fruit regularly? Maybe you should. Are you 100 years young and happy, and in your kitchen bouncing around, making your own food and still promoting your way of life? You could be.

Go on a fast to improve brain health and live longer


Mention the word, "fasting" and it's bound to raise eyebrows. Some say it's a great way to recharge our system and put our bodies on track while others are adamant that it's harmful, suggesting that it throws our bodies out of whack. Where do researchers at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore side? They shun the latter statement, saying that fasting is good for us. So good, in fact, that it benefits our brains and promotes longevity. Take that, naysayers.

Each day, are you shortening or extending your life?


Beginning with the moment you wake up, what personal care products, foods, beverages, cleaning products and supplements are you using and consuming? Your skin is your largest organ, and you only have one body in this life. Let's examine two ways of going about a typical day and see the MAJOR differences some people can make to either incur health detriment or boost their immunity and vitality. Here we go.

Look years younger by ditching health-sapping bad habits


It has been shown repeatedly that bad habits are detrimental to a person's health. Whether this involves smoking or using smokeless tobacco, drinking in excess, not exercising, eating high fat and calorie food, or any number of myriad of other bad habits, they can actually shorten the lifespan of that particular person. In fact, in some cases, these bad habits can take a dozen or more years off their lives.

World's oldest yoga teacher spills secrets of youth and healing


Tao Porchon-Lynch can balance all of her weight on her forearms, lifting her entire body up and parallel to the floor without the need for support from her legs. She also engages in competitive dancing, cutting a rug with dancing partners half her age.

Tree nuts found to lower death rate by 20 percent


A study by scientists from the Harvard School of Public Health has shown that those who consume nuts daily reduce the risk of death by 20 percent from any cause of death. For death caused by heart problems, eating nuts reduces the risk of death by 29 percent. It was also observed that eating nuts reduces deaths caused by cancer by 11 percent.

World's oldest animal was 507 years old, until scientists killed it


Although scientists and their conservation efforts (let's forget their destructive efforts for this article) have done some amazing things to save numerous plants and animals, like determining that DDT was one factor affecting the birth rates of the American bald eagle (leading to its eventual recovery), they also make mistakes. One such mistake was accidentally killing the world's oldest animal.