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Longevity

Stop taking statin drugs - high cholesterol leads to longer life

By Dagan:(NaturalNews) High cholesterol levels are believed to lead to heart conditions and early death. Statin drugs to lower LDL cholesterol are prescribed to more than 13 million Americans, and almost all men over the age of 60. Research published in the Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism in April 2015 now shows that, as you age, having high cholesterol is beneficial. The research, which was conducted in Japan, showed that people with the highest cholesterol levels had the lowest mortality rate from heart disease.

Standing increases longevity and builds telomeres

By Dagan: (NaturalNews) Standing up is good for your health. People who stand live longer and have longer telomeres, an indicator of good health and longevity. Sitting is tied to disease and aging. Research has now shown that standing instead of sitting can prevent telomere shortening. Circuit training is also recommended, but actually the time you spend on your feet may be more important that time spent exercising, as far as telomere length protection is concerned.

Solar activity may affect our life in profound ways

By Devon: (NaturalNews) It's easy to get caught up in the material things of our modern day society, rushing through, not paying any attention to the skies hovering around our head. We walk the globe, not realizing that we're hanging off a sphere, grounded by a powerful force of gravity that keeps us from falling through the sky and out into the black. As we are spun around a sphere, the very sphere that we rely on is circling around a giant, fiery heat source. When we stop and look up, we realize that we are at the mercy of much greater powers in the universe.

Secret to long life found in 115-year-old woman's blood


In 2005, 115-year-old Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper passed away to old age healthy and disease-free. At the time of her death, Schipper became the oldest person to have her body donated to science. Longevity researchers were interested in understanding why a healthy person suddenly dies of old age. A group of Dutch researchers may be onto something. After researching the woman's stem cells, Dutch researchers, led by Henne Holstege, may have found out why this woman lived disease-free for well over a century and why her body shut down when it did.

Secret to long life found in 115-year-old woman's blood


In 2005, 115-year-old Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper passed away to old age healthy and disease-free. At the time of her death, Schipper became the oldest person to have her body donated to science. Longevity researchers were interested in understanding why a healthy person suddenly dies of old age. A group of Dutch researchers may be onto something. After researching the woman's stem cells, Dutch researchers, led by Henne Holstege, may have found out why this woman lived disease-free for well over a century and why her body shut down when it did.

3 easy habits for a long, disease-free life


Telomeres (tiny bits of DNA that influence longevity and health) have been causing quite a stir among researchers lately --- and for good reason. The length of these protective caps on the end of chromosomes determine how quickly cells age, and how prone we are to having a stroke or developing cancer, cardiovascular disease, obesity, vascular dementia, diabetes and osteoporosis. Essentially, the shorter your telomeres, the shorter your lifespan. And yet, we don't have to be at the mercy of our genetics. Have a look at the following tips which help foster strong telomeres -- as well as resistance to disease and aging.

Bernando LaPallo of Mesa, Arizona is 112 years young and is happy and healthy too


Do you juice greens with a vegetable juicer and make smoothies with organic fruit regularly? Maybe you should. Are you 100 years young and happy, and in your kitchen bouncing around, making your own food and still promoting your way of life? You could be.

Go on a fast to improve brain health and live longer


Mention the word, "fasting" and it's bound to raise eyebrows. Some say it's a great way to recharge our system and put our bodies on track while others are adamant that it's harmful, suggesting that it throws our bodies out of whack. Where do researchers at the National Institute on Aging in Baltimore side? They shun the latter statement, saying that fasting is good for us. So good, in fact, that it benefits our brains and promotes longevity. Take that, naysayers.