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Japan

End is Near? Global Earthquake Epidemic

Israel News, 19 April 2016
Four earthquakes were recorded around the globe, including three major shakers in the last 48 hours. A minor earthquake hit eastern Israel Friday morning one day after a deadly quake hit Japan.
Read more at http://www.breakingisraelnews.com/65767/end-near-four-earthquakes-around...

4 Years After Fukushima Nuclear Calamity, Japanese Divided on Whether to Return

For four years, an eerie quiet has pervaded the clusters of farmhouses and terraced rice paddies of this mountainous village, emptied of people after the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, 25 miles away, spewed radiation over a wide swath of northeastern Japan.

Japan's nuclear industry sacrificing 99.99 percent of its people for profits, says expert


The three-year anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster recently passed, and a prominent nuclear expert has come out in protest of the way both the Japanese government and the country's nuclear industry continue to handle the situation. During a recent episode of the Nuclear Hotseat podcast, celebrity and lawmaker Taro Yamamoto lamented how the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) is still downplaying the threat of radiation, which he believes will end up "sacrificing" 99.99 percent of the Japanese population.

Scientists studying radiation in Japan are subject to 'insidious censorship'


In order to appease the fears of the public and maintain order, leaders of government institutions often restrict valuable and alarming information from broadcast or publication. This censorship keeps the masses unaware but cooperative, as the truth is picked through and decimated. Such leaders are often timid and tend to uphold the status quo. They will typically refrain from riling people up so as not to disturb the powers of special interest that could shutter their career and livelihood.

Radiation contaminated more than 20,000 square miles and 43 million people in Japan: EU report


In the three months following the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, which occurred back in March 2011, a land area larger than 20,000 square miles (mi2) became contaminated with high levels of radionuclides of both cesium and iodine, says a new European Commission report. Using the most realistic estimates in a mathematical model, scientists determined that as many as 43 million Japanese people, and perhaps even more, were exposed during that time to high levels of the two contaminants, which are still being spewed from the shuttered plant to this very day.

Barbaric Japanese stage annual dolphin hunt for fun


A longtime Japanese tradition of hunting and slaughtering dolphins for sport has come under fire from the West for its barbarically low view of this highly intelligent animal species. The U.K.'s Guardian reports that the U.S. Ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy, recently held a press conference after making disparaging comments about the inhumanity that she believes is driving the killing spree.

Novartis caught red-handed fabricating clinical trial data in Japan


Switzerland-based pharmaceutical kingpin Novartis is under investigation in Japan after two universities there recently caught the company engaging in scientific fraud. According to new reports, a former Novartis employee fabricated clinical trial data to exaggerate the benefits of the blood pressure drug Diovan (valsartan), which is currently licensed for use in more than 100 countries, and Japan's Ministry of Health is now trying to determine whether or not Novartis in any way violated Japanese law with its actions.
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Roche drug approved in Japan for treatment of brain cancer


Japan's health ministry has approved drug Avastin for the treatment of aggressive brain cancer in Japan, Swiss pharmaceuticals company Roche said on Monday. Avastin is the first new medicine approved worldwide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma, the most common and aggressive form of primary brain cancer, in the last eight years, Roche said.