SUBSCRIBE BY RSS rss feed | EMAIL
Natural Solutions Radio header image

High Cholesterol

Statin Scam: People with Higher Cholesterol Live Longer than People with Low Cholesterol

Brian Shilhavy Health Impact News Editor

Here is a fact that has been known for quite a long time, but it is still news to many people:

People with higher cholesterol levels live longer than people with lower cholesterol levels.

Read that again, slowly, and no, it is not a typo.

High cholesterol means longer life

By Huff:(NaturalNews) If you still think cholesterol is bad for your health, you're not paying attention to the latest peer-reviewed science. Researchers out of Japan have confirmed, along with a multitude of others in recent years, that high cholesterol is not a positive risk factor for heart disease and death as is commonly believed. To the contrary, high cholesterol is linked to a longer lifespan, while low cholesterol points to early disease and death.

Myth exposed: Do eggs really cause high cholesterol?


For years mainstream medicine and public health organizations have put eggs on the black list for those with high cholesterol. This view flooded the market with a series of "egg substitutes" and led to the birth of the "egg white only" movement. This movement was founded on the assumption that foods containing high cholesterol... cause high cholesterol. However, not only do eggs not increase cholesterol; they could help prevent cardiovascular disease.

Cholesterol-lowering supplements: What works, what doesn't

If you're looking for an all-natural way to lower your cholesterol -- in addition to watching what you eat and exercising -- there are plenty of dietary supplements on the market that claim to do the trick. Each year seems to bring a new alternative remedy -- garlic, ginseng, or red yeast rice, for example -- that users tout as the next best thing to get cholesterol under control.

Baseline and On-Treatment High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and the Risk of Cancer in Randomized Controlled Trials

We sought to examine the relationship between high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels and the risk of the development of cancer in large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of lipid-altering interventions.