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General Health

Stress Hormone in Skin May Trigger Acne, Oily Skin

May 14,2002

By Melissa Schorr

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A stress-related hormone that affects the release of oils in the skin may be a potential cause of skin disorders such as excessively dry or oily skin, explaining the link between stress and acne breakouts, German researchers report.

"Stress may upregulate the production of neuropeptides in the skin that regulate oil," lead author Dr. Christos C.

Voracious Reading Linked to Early Nearsightedness

Mon May 20, 2002

By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Reading a large number of books per week may not only expand a child's vocabulary, it may also increase his or her risk of developing severe myopia, or nearsightedness, according to a team of researchers from China and Singapore.

Sharp Rise in Lupus Deaths Noted Among Black Women

Thu May 2, 2002

By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Between 1979 and 1998 there was an approximate 70% increase in lupus deaths among middle-aged black women in the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Thursday.

Stroke Ups Risk of Bone Loss, Fractures

Thu May 2, 2002

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Patients who experience stroke are at increased risk of bone loss and fractures, and should be treated to prevent bone loss before falls and fractures occur, according to UK researchers.

The investigators base their recommendations, published in the May issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, on an analysis of several studies examining bone loss and fracture risk in stroke patients.

Shiatsu 'Massage Machine' Linked to Artery Problem

Mon May 6, 2002

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In two cases, patients developed a potentially life-threatening arterial problem, possibly caused by a type of shiatsu "massage machine," researchers report. Shiatsu is a type of therapeutic massage in which a person typically massages acupuncture pressure points using the thumbs and palm.

Annual Exam Abandoned by Docs, Desired by Patients

Mon May 6, 2002

By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The idea that individuals should undergo annual medical check-ups was abandoned by American health professionals several years ago, but many patients still think that such exams are necessary, new study findings show.

These patients may be unaware that annual comprehensive physical examinations have been shown to have little or no value and have thus been rejected by the American Medical Association, the US Public Health Service and various other medical organizations.

Patients Fasting Unnecessarily Long Before Surgery

Mon May 6, 2002

By Melissa Schorr

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Too many patients are following outdated guidelines about how long to fast before they undergo surgery, researchers report.

"Patients undergo excessively prolonged fasting," study co-author Jeanette Crenshaw, family education coordinator at the Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas, told Reuters Health. "It doesn't make them any safer, so why make them hungry?"

Stroke Low on List of Americans' Most-Feared Ills

Thu May 2, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Americans appear to prefer to keep a blind eye to their own stroke risk even after someone they know has suffered a stroke, according to the results of a new survey conducted by the American Heart Association.

In February of this year, 1,000 US adults were asked which, if any, health threat they most feared. Only 10 respondents (1%) said they feared having a stroke, despite the fact that 35% of those surveyed reported having had a stroke themselves or having a close friend or relative with a recent stroke.

Skin Infections Linked to Nail Salon's Footbaths

Wed May 1, 2002

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - An outbreak of severe bacterial skin infections in California has been traced to the footbaths used for pedicures at one nail salon, according to health officials.

They found that all 10 whirlpool footbaths at the salon harbored Mycobacterium fortuitum, which they believe caused furunculosis--a skin disease marked by large boils--in 110 customers.

Large-Volume Liposuction May Also Improve Health

Wed May 1, 2002

By Kathleen Doheny

LAS VEGAS (Reuters Health) - Removing large volumes of fat via liposuction may not only improve a woman's appearance, but can also improve her health, according to a new report.

"Being overweight is not just unattractive, it's unhealthy," said Dr. Sharon Y. Giese, a New York City aesthetic surgeon who will report Thursday on the health benefits of large-volume liposuction for women at the annual meeting of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery in Las Vegas, Nevada.