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Fukushima

Harvard report takes a look inside the Fukushima exclusion zone


The real and continuing effects from Fukushima still loom large closest to the radiation zone and within Tokyo where it impacts food, trade and water. Much of the population has a skewed view of the safety since the meltdown of several reactors occurred in 2011, in part due to unreliable reports and reluctant confirmations about issues.

Scientists predict radioactive cesium-137 from Fukushima to reach North American coast soon


Fallout from the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster in northern Japan in March 2011 continues to mount, as scientists now estimate that radioactive materials from the contaminated site are likely to reach North American shores later this year.

Radioactive cesium uptake continues in fish off the coast of Fukushima


It has been almost three years, and Fukushima continues to endanger the biosphere. A study published in the October 2013 Journal of Environmental Radioactivity on the effects of the Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant disaster in marine life confirms that radioactive cesium is continuing to be concentrated in the Pacific Ocean's aquatic food chain.

Number of U.S. sailors damaged by Fukushima radiation continues to rise


Sailors aboard the USS Ronald Reagan, one of the nation's most modern aircraft carriers, were the first to respond to the stricken nuclear power station at Fukushima, Japan, in March 2011, following a devastating earthquake and tsunami which struck the site and heavily damaged three of the plant's six nuclear reactors.

Fukushima harms commerce as Russia rejects radioactive Japanese cars


While officials in the United States astoundingly continue to deny that radiation levels originating from Fukushima pose a significant threat to American lives, despite many troubling pieces of evidence, Russia has shown its willingness to refuse radiation-tainted goods by turning away 130 used cars originating from Japan.

Fukushima continues to contaminate environment; cleanup expected to take decades


Cleanup efforts at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility were taken up a notch recently, as crews began hauling the spent fuel rods out of the infamous Reactor 4, which sustained terminal damage when the tsunami struck it back in 2011. But this is just the beginning of a massive remediation effort at the site, which experts say could take many decades to complete due to the catastrophic destruction caused by the massive earthquake and storm surge.
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Fukushima's two worst-case scenarios explained by Arnie Gunderson


Recently, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ordered the Tokyo Electric and Power Co., or TEPCO, to decommission two more reactors at its Fukushima power plant, which was heavily damaged following an earthquake and tsunami in March 2011.
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Fukushima fiasco: Tepco's risky removal of radioactive fuel could set off uncontrolled chain reaction; emergency delay invoked


The Tokyo Electric Power Co. announced it is delaying the relocation of fuel rods from its crippled plant reactors. Work was originally scheduled to begin today due to the fact that fuel rods remain highly vulnerable in the damaged storage pools. Right now, Fukushima is just one earthquake or tidal wave away from structural collapse, causing a catastrophic release of radioactive fuel directly into the atmosphere.

Fukushima cleanup efforts put northern hemisphere on alert


At an estimated cost of $150 billion, the Fukushima nuclear power plant 'cleanup' efforts have suspicious ties to organized crime and many on-site workers lack the required expertise to handle such nuclear disasters safely or effectively. With over 7 layers of poorly-supervised sub-contractors, like Tepco, Kajima and Obayashi Corp. - workers are routinely being exposed, in less than 1 hour, to deadly levels of radiation. But, there's more to this story and the truth needs to be told.
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Big Trouble from Fukushima


Radioactivity levels in a well near a storage tank at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in Japan have risen immensely on Thursday, the plant’s operator has reported. Officials of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said last Friday that they detected 400,000 becquerels per liter of beta ray-emitting radioactive substances – including strontium – at the site, a level 6,500 times higher than readings taken the day before. The headlines are alarming: vast leaks of radioactive water, international experts are being drafted in and spikes in radiation levels continue to occur. How bad is the situation at Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant? Hell on earth fits the bill and there is little to nothing to do about it. After one shoots him or herself in the gut there is also little to do. The future of humanity is not particularly very bright as our prospects for healthy clean existence on the surface of our once beautiful planet dim.
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