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First Amendment

It is now a felony to film cops in Illinois - criminalized for documenting police abuse

By Heyes:(NaturalNews) The Illinois Supreme Court struck down a state eavesdropping law earlier this year that criminalized citizen recordings of conversations with police or anyone else without their consent.

Man arrested for Facebook insults sues Wisconsin police for violating First Amendment

By Heyes:(NaturalNews) A Wisconsin man who has filed suit in federal court has claimed that Village of Arena police introduced irrelevant racial undertones in an investigation of him, resulting in an unfair arrest.

As reported by Courthouse News, the recently filed complaint names the village as well as police officer Nicholas Stroik, and involves community reactions to the July 19, 2012, arrests of "several African-Americans suspected of burglary."

Connecticut cops violate First Amendment, punish photographer for using drone to document accident scene


A local news reporter from Hartford, Connecticut, has filed a lawsuit against the Hartford Police Department (HPD) for allegedly violating his free speech rights following a recent vehicle accident. Courthouse News Service (CNS) reports that Pedro Rivera was interrogated by officers and later punished by his employer for flying a small, remote-controlled aircraft 150 feet above the scene of the accident, even though he was within his rights to do so.

Man facing 13 years in prison for criticizing banks; judge bars any mention of First Amendment in his defense


"Insanity" is a term that best describes the large and growing American Nanny State, but there are varying degrees of insanity within it. For example, Nanny State insanity is compounded in states - say, California for instance - where unrestrained progressive liberalism has so influenced the lawmaking process that it completely confounds reasoned outside observers.

EDITORIAL: Defending the First Amendment


Seven years ago, Judith Miller, a reporter for The New York Times, became the heroine of a cause celebre when federal prosecutors demanded she testify to a grand jury investigating a White House leak divulging that Valerie Plame was an undercover operative of the CIA. The government demanded she reveal her confidential sources for stories she wrote about the leak. Ms. Miller refused, and she was found in contempt of court and jailed for 85 days. She became a household name and the poster child for freedom of the press.