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Exercise

Lou Gehrig's Patients Tend to Be Former Athletes

Fri Apr 19, 2002

DENVER (Reuters Health) - Patients with diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis--also known as Lou Gehrig's disease--are more likely to have been slim and athletic than those with other types of neurological ailments, according to researchers at Columbia University in New York.

The researchers decided to conduct the study because celebrities with the disease have often been athletes, including baseball great Lou Gehrig, heavyweight champion Ezzard Charles and baseball pitcher Catfish Hunter.

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Exercise Does Not Protect Smokers From Cancer

Fri Apr 12, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Male smokers who think walking, swimming or other physical activity will lower their risk of lung cancer are wrong, researchers say.

"The results of our study suggest that neither occupational nor leisure-time physical activity is associated with the risk of lung cancer in long-term cigarette smokers," write lead study author Dr. Lisa H. Colbert of the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland and her colleagues.

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Exercise Can Lower Risk of Death From Stroke

Tue Apr 16, 2002

By Suzanne Rostler

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who are physically fit and maintain a regular aerobic exercise program are less likely to suffer a stroke than their sedentary peers, study findings indicate.

According to the report, physical activity may reduce the risk of stroke, the third leading cause of death in the US, by lowering the risk of high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes.

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Report Urges Exercise to Lower Blood Pressure

Mon Apr 1, 2002

By Jacqueline Stenson

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Researchers who reviewed more than 50 studies on the effects of exercise on blood pressure have a message for all couch-potatoes out there: Get moving.

Whether you are overweight or trim, have hypertension or normal blood pressure, engaging in regular exercise such as walking, cycling, jogging or swimming can help lower your blood pressure and your subsequent risk of heart attack and stroke, according to the report in the April 2nd issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Low-Impact Exercise May Boost Women's Bone Mass

Low-Impact Exercise May Boost Women's Bone Mass

October 29, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Aerobic exercise can increase women's bone density, and it need not be a high-impact regimen to work, new research shows.

In fact, experts' recommendations for general health--walking for about 30 minutes a day, a few days a week--is enough to lend the bones a hand, George A. Kelley, of the Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions in Boston, told Reuters Health.

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Exercise May Help Patients with Heart Failure

Exercise May Help Patients with Heart Failure

October 30, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Moderate aerobic exercise appears to lower levels of an immune system protein that may contribute to congestive heart failure (CHF), new study findings suggest.

In the study, a group of men with CHF participated in an exercise program at a rehabilitation center supervised by instructors specializing in cardiac rehabilitation. After the 3-month program, the men had significantly lower levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, a protein that helps trigger inflammation.

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Exercise Maintains Elders' Helpful Angina Response

Exercise Maintains Elders' Helpful Angina Response

November 1, 2001 By Melissa Schorr

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Physical activity may help elderly patients retain a preconditioning response produced prior to a heart attack that seems to offer some protection against death, Italian researchers report.

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Short Exercise Bouts as Effective as Long Session

Short Exercise Bouts as Effective as Long Session

October 17, 2001 By Suzanne Rostler

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Individuals who forego exercise for lack of time may need to find a new excuse, results of a new study suggest. According to the report, short bursts of activity are just as effective as one long session when it comes to burning calories, losing weight and improving aerobic fitness.

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