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Diet

THE EVIL POTATO

One of the first foods that someone on a diet learns to avoid, by well-meaning friends, relative, doctors, and diet books, are potatoes. Potatoes are rich in complex carbs, which turn into sugar in the body, and make you fat. Right? Well not so fast.

Nobody has ever gotten obese eating potatoes. Rather, it’s all the stuff that people put on potatoes that’s to blame. I’ll argue that displacing other fatty foods with potatoes can only result in better health outcomes.

If you only ate potatoes all day, to get all of your 2000 calories, you would get:

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Pre-Workout Nutrition: How to Maximize (or Jeopardize) Your Chance to Burn Fat

By Ori Hofmekler

I'd like to set the record straight regarding pre-workout nutrition. This is a tricky topic that requires a short biological and science overview, so bear with me.

A growing body of research indicates that nature selects underfed species for extended lifespan and vice versa – it shortens the life expectancy of overfed species. Humans are no exception. The human body evolved to thrive under nutritional stress.

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10 Benefits of Eating Pineapple Every Day

We love articles that tell us to eat what we already love. This one is no exception. Pineapples are delicious in a fruit salad, with ham, or on a pizza – they’re sweet, delicious, and also just so happen to be really good for your health.

10 Reasons Pineapples Are Amazing

  1. Every Serving Contains 10 Essential Nutrients

That’s right, in and around all that yellowy goodness is a ton of different nutrients, including:

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Long-Time Vegetarians may Have Altered DNA – This is What it Means

A new study published in Molecular Biology and Evolution suggests that consuming a long-term vegetarian diet may alter human DNA and make people more susceptible to some cancers and heart disease.

: Health-promoting Nordic diet reduces inflammatory gene activity in adipose tissue

EurekAlert, 5-Jan-2015
A Nordic study led by the Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland discovered that the health-promoting Nordic diet reduces the expression of inflammation-associated genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue.