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Diabetes

<b>How Teens Face Stress May Affect Diabetes Control</.b>

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The approach teenage diabetics take to coping with problems may help determine how well they manage their disease, according to a new study.

Researchers found that among 103 teens with type 1 diabetes, those with more positive, practical responses to life's difficulties showed better blood sugar control than those who had more negative attitudes.

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Erection Problems Signal Heart Ills in Diabetics

Mon Jun 21, 2004

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Men with diabetes who also have trouble getting an erection may have heart disease and not even realize it, Italian doctors said on Monday.

The study is among the first to document what some experts had predicted with the advent of new drugs to treat erectile dysfunction -- that they would help flush out men with heart disease but no serious symptoms apart from erectile problems.

"If our findings are confirmed, erectile dysfunction may become a potential

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High-Fiber Cereal Cuts Excess Insulin Production

Mon Jun 14, 2004

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People in danger of developing type 2 diabetes often have high levels of insulin; because they are "insulin resistant," glucose is not processed properly and the pancreas compensates by producing more insulin.

Now, a study in the medical journal Diabetes Care suggests that dietary fiber might prevent so-called hyperinsulinemia -- and perhaps help ward off full-blown diabetes.

Dr. Thomas M. S.

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Soda May Increase Female Diabetes Risk

Tue Jun 8, 2004

By MIKE BRANOM, Associated Press Writer

ORLANDO, Florida - Chugging more than one sugar-sweetened soft drink a day appears to significantly increase a woman's chances of developing diabetes, says a Harvard study that found the extra sugar does more than just add pounds.

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Weight Training Improves Diabetic Nerve Function

Fri Jun 4, 2004

By Megan Rauscher

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Resistance training improves nerve function in elderly diabetic patients with a common condition called peripheral neuropathy, according to findings presented today at the annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association. It also has a favorable impact on risk factors for heart disease.

Peripheral neuropathy typically affects the feet and hands and can cause a variety of problems including numbness, tingling sensations, pain, and weakness.

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Lower Blood Sugar Helps Memory in Diabetes -Study

Sat Jun 5, 2004

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Poor memory and brain function is an important but overlooked side effect of diabetes, but controlling blood sugar helps, researchers said on Saturday.

Patients with type-2 diabetes are likely to have trouble remembering, multi-tasking and learning new things, said Dr. Richard Nesto, chairman of Cardiovascular Medicine Department, at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Massachusetts.

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Immune Therapy Stops Diabetes in Mouse Study

Mon Jun 7, 2004

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Using one type of immune system cell to turn off another stopped type-1 diabetes in mice and may offer a new approach to the devastating disease, U.S. researchers said on Monday.

The study suggests it may be possible to retrain a faulty immune system, stopping it from ravaging the pancreas and causing type-1 or juvenile diabetes, the researchers said.

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Think About Statins for Every Diabetic -Group

Thu Jun 3, 2004

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Almost everyone with diabetes should consider taking a statin drug to lower cholesterol, even if they already have low cholesterol levels, the American Diabetes Association advised on Thursday.

Diabetes patients are at such high risk of heart disease that the statins almost certainly will do them some good, the group said in its latest treatment guidelines.

People with diabetes should all consider taking a daily aspirin, too, the new guidelines say.

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Obesity/Diabetes Could Hit Life Expectancy -Experts

By Patricia Reaney

PRAGUE (Reuters) - Twin global epidemics of obesity and diabetes are out of control and could reduce life expectancy in the future, health experts said on Friday.

Obesity, a major risk factor for diabetes, already affects 300 million people worldwide while an estimated 194 million suffer from diabetes.

By 2025 the number of obese people is expected soar to 333 million.

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Avoiding Painful Side Effect of Diabetes

TUESDAY, May 25 (HealthDayNews) -- A Midwestern University study may help explain why people with type 2 diabetes and women with gestational diabetes are more likely to develop urinary tract infections (UTIs) than people with type 1 diabetes.

The researchers focused on the effects of insulin on Escherichia coli bacteria, which commonly cause UTIs. They found that concentrations of insulin and glucose similar to levels found in the urine of people with type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes increase the ability of E. coli to adhere in the bladder.

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