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Depression

The New Antidepressant Warnings: Not Enough to Prevent Further Harm

After Finally Issuing Warnings 16 Years Late, British and U.S. Authorities Fail to Tell Doctors and Patients How to Actually Prevent Serious Side Effects, Leaving Millions at Further Risk. What Should Be Done?
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Is Low Dietary Intake of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Associated With Depression?

Provided by The American Journal of Psychiatry on 4/3/2004
by Hakkarainen, Reeta; Partonen, Timo; Haukka, Jari; Virtamo, Jarmo; Et al

Originally Published:20040301.

Omega-3 fatty acids are essential long-chain poly-unsaturated fatty acids that are concentrated in the CNS, retina, and testes in humans. Alpha-linolenic acid is present in plants and is needed for the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids that are received directly from marine sources.

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Cholesterol Drug May Also Prevent Depression

Tue Aug 19, 2003

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Long-term treatment with cholesterol-lowering "statins" -- drugs like Zocor or Lipitor  -- seems to be good not only for the heart but also for mental health, researchers in Boston report.

That news, while welcome, is somewhat unexpected. More than a decade ago, vigorous cholesterol lowering was actually linked with depression and violent behavior, Dr. Charles M.

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Study: Depression from Job Loss Is Long Lasting

Mon Oct 7, 2002

By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - While it may not be surprising that job loss and the resulting financial strain can lead to depression, new study findings show that this and other negative consequences of unemployment can last for up to 2 years, even after a person gets another job.

It is not simply the loss of employment that keeps individuals in a prolonged state of depression or otherwise poor health, the report indicates, but rather the "cascade of negative events" that follows that loss.

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Can Pesticides Trigger Depression? Study Continues

Sep 5, 2002 

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Farm workers poisoned by industrial strength agricultural pesticides containing organophosphates face a nearly sixfold increased risk of suffering depression in the months following their exposure, new study findings show. 

Organophosphates are extremely toxic and easily absorbed into the bloodstream through the skin, nose, eyes, gut and lungs. Immediately after being poisoned, a person may experience vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, headaches and blurred vision, among other symptoms. 

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