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Dental Health

Smile! A new Canadian tool can re-grow teeth say inventors

OTTAWA (AFP) Jun 28, 2006 - Snaggle-toothed hockey players and sugar

lovers may soon rejoice as Canadian scientists said they have created the first device able to re-grow teeth and bones.

The researchers at the University of Alberta in Edmonton filed patents earlier this month in the United States for the tool based on low-intensity pulsed ultrasound technology after testing it on a dozen dental patients in Canada.

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Tooth Fillings With Mercury Are Held Safe

By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Published: April 19, 2006

CHICAGO, April 18 — Two long-awaited studies have found no evidence that dental fillings containing mercury can cause brain damage or other neurological problems in children, researchers plan to report on Wednesday.

Some experts called the findings reassuring. But the studies, which were financed by the federal government, are unlikely to end the debate over the long-term effects of what are known as amalgam fillings, and some people accused the researchers of conducting unethical experiments on children.

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Red wine may treat gum disease: study

www.chinaview.cn 2006-03-13

BEIJING, March 13(Xinhuanet) -- Chemicals in red wine could help prevent or treat gum disease, a new study suggests.

    Researchers at the Universite Laval in Canada find the abilities of polyphenols in red wine can block the production of "free radicals," which can damage gum tissue.

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Puffing on a hookah may lead to gum disease

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Though water pipes are widely viewed as a "safer" way to smoke, they may be as damaging to the teeth and gums as cigarettes are, a new study suggests.

Water pipes, or hookahs, have long been used for smoking tobacco in the Middle East, North Africa and parts of Asia, and "hookah lounges" are increasingly popping up in the U.S. and other countries.

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Tooth loss from gum disease: are you at risk?

By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Male gender, smoking, inadequate oral hygiene and rheumatoid arthritis are among the factors associated with an increased risk of losing teeth because of periodontal disease, a study shows.

"Periodontal disease is a major reason for losing teeth as is generally known, but there are some factors that appear to increase one's risk," study author Dr. Khalaf F. Al-Shammari, of Kuwait University in Jahra, told Reuters Health.

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More vitamin D may mean healthier gums

Fri Oct 14, 2005

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People with higher blood levels of vitamin D may be less likely to develop gum disease, a new study suggests.

Using data from a national U.S. health survey, researchers found that teenagers and adults with the highest blood levels of vitamin D were 20 percent less likely than those with the lowest levels to show signs of gingivitis -- a milder form of gum disease in which the gums become swollen and bleed easily.

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