SUBSCRIBE BY RSS rss feed | EMAIL
Natural Solutions Radio header image

cognitive decline

Low vitamin D level predicts cognitive decline in older population

Journal of the American Medical Association-Neurology, September 15, 2015
Older adults with deficiencies in vitamin D experience more rapid cognitive decline over time than those with adequate vitamin D levels.

Diabetes in midlife could lead to cognitive problems later in life, study shows

By Antonia: (NaturalNews) Researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have discovered that middle-aged people who did not properly manage their blood sugar levels were almost 20 percent more likely to have cognitive issues later in their life than middle-aged people with normal blood sugar levels.(1)

Green, leafy veggies slow age-related cognitive decline, making brains 11 years younger

(NaturalNews) A diet rich in green, leafy vegetables could dramatically slow age-related cognitive decline, according to a study conducted by researchers from Rush University Medical Center and presented on March 30 at the Experimental Biology 2015 meeting in Boston.

The researchers found that much of the protective benefit from the greens came from vitamin K, which the body synthesizes from a precursor found at high levels in green leafy vegetables.

Three superfoods that can support brain function and prevent cognitive decline


People have long believed that cognitive decline is an inherent and inevitable symptom of aging. In reality, however, most age-related mental conditions -- from minor irritations like forgetfulness to serious neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia -- are the product of toxic environments, unhealthy lifestyles and poor nutrition. For this reason, there are many things that individuals of all ages can do to prevent age-related cognitive decline, including getting enough sleep and exercise, optimizing gut flora and eating foods that are rich in vitamin B12 and omega-3 fatty acids.

Dementia epidemic looms as number of sufferers expected to more than triple by 2050


More people than previously thought are believed to be suffering from some form of dementia, says a new report issued by Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI). The latest estimates reveal that as many as 135 million people globally will be suffering from the disease in 2050, a 17 percent increase over previous figures released by ADI in its 2009 World Alzheimer Report.