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Childrens Health

Premature Babies Do Not Fare Better in US

Mon Jun 3, 2002 

By Suzanne Rostler

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Directing more healthcare dollars to prenatal care and reproductive services might improve survival rates of premature babies in the US, recent study findings suggest.

The researchers found that the US has a much higher percentage of doctors trained to treat at-risk newborns and more neonatal intensive care units than Australia, Canada and the UK, which devote more resources to preconception and prenatal care.

Premature Babies Do Not Fare Better in US

Mon Jun 3, 2002 

By Suzanne Rostler

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Directing more healthcare dollars to prenatal care and reproductive services might improve survival rates of premature babies in the US, recent study findings suggest.

The researchers found that the US has a much higher percentage of doctors trained to treat at-risk newborns and more neonatal intensive care units than Australia, Canada and the UK, which devote more resources to preconception and prenatal care.

Removing Bedroom TV May Cut Obesity Risk in Kids

Mon Jun 3, 2002

By Suzanne Rostler

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - As America's kids continue to pack on the pounds, a team of doctors recommends a simple step that parents can take to lower their preschooler's risk of obesity: removing the TV from the child's bedroom.

US Teens Risking Skin Cancer for Tan: Study

Mon Jun 3, 2002

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Despite publicized warnings about the risks of skin cancer from too much sun exposure, most US teenagers do not use sun block and will endure sunburns to obtain a desired tan, researchers said on Monday.

Boston University researchers surveyed more than 10,000 children of nurses across the United States participating in the Nurses' Health Study, which began in the late 1980s.

US Teens Risking Skin Cancer for Tan: Study

Mon Jun 3, 2002

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Despite publicized warnings about the risks of skin cancer from too much sun exposure, most US teenagers do not use sun block and will endure sunburns to obtain a desired tan, researchers said on Monday.

Boston University researchers surveyed more than 10,000 children of nurses across the United States participating in the Nurses' Health Study, which began in the late 1980s.

High Doses of Caffeine Can Affect Preemies' Organs

Tue May 7, 2002

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Caffeine can help premature infants to breathe and raise their heart rates, but high doses can also reduce blood flow to vital organs such as the brain, German researchers report.

The finding may help doctors walk a fine line in helping such tiny infants to survive without causing other problems, said study author Dr. Otwin Linderkamp of the University of Heidelberg.

Study Links Breast-Feeding to Higher Adult IQ

Tue May 7, 2002

By Suzanne Rostler

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Infants who are breast-fed for up to 9 months may out-smart their peers as adults, a new study suggests.

The findings support a growing body of research linking breast-feeding with intellectual development in early and middle childhood, but are the first to show an association between breast-feeding and adult intelligence, Dr.

Breast-Feeding May Reduce Sudden Infant Deaths

Tue May 21, 2002

By Serena Gordon
HealthScoutNews Reporter

TUESDAY, May 21 (HealthScoutNews) -- A new study offers yet another possible benefit to breast milk -- a reduced risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

The Swedish research, published in the June issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood, found that babies who were breast-fed exclusively for fewer than eight weeks had a three to five times greater risk of dying from SIDS than babies who were breast-fed exclusively for four months or more.

Exercise the Key for Overweight Kids to Thin Down

Tue May 21, 2002

TUESDAY, May 21 (HealthScoutNews) -- Obese kids need to pump it up to tone their weight down.

Strength training combined with a low energy diet is the best way to tackle childhood obesity, says a new study from the Chinese University in Hong Kong.

This approach is more effective than dieting alone in promoting much healthier cholesterol levels while still allowing children to gain height, says the study published in the June issue of the journal Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Kids with ADHD Taking Antidepressants, Other Drugs

Tue May 7, 2002

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Youngsters with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more likely than other children to be taking antidepressants or other medication, even though it's not clear how well they work with traditional stimulant drugs used to treat ADHD, according to researchers.