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broccoli

Horseradish contains 10x more glucosinolate than broccoli, making it a potent cancer-fighting superfood

You might have heard that broccoli can help fight cancer. If you’re not a fan of this cruciferous vegetable, you might be struggling to increase your intake.

Scientists document at the anti-obesity effects of tomato and broccoli

Increased levels of resistin, an adipocyte hormone that regulates glucose metabolism, may cause obesity leading to insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes.

How to Cook Broccoli

Michael Greger, February 9th, 2016
When I used to teach medical students at Tufts, I gave a lecture about this amazing new therapeutic called “iloccor-B.” I’d talk about all the new science, all the things it could do, its excellent safety profile.

Healthy benefits of eating broccoli


In order to prevent arteries from clogging, researchers from Imperial College London suggest consuming at least one cup of broccoli daily. Their research findings concludes that there is a chemical in leafy green vegetables, as well as broccoli, that offers protective measures for the heart, including preventing artery blockages.
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European Patent Office grants Monsanto patent on natural broccoli seeds, florets


Monsanto's efforts to usher genetically-modified organisms (GMOs) into the European Union (EU) have been largely stagnant in recent years, so the multinational corporation and others in the industry are taking a new and more evil approach to gain more market control. According to a recent announcement put forth by the human rights advocacy group No Patents on Seeds!, the European Patent Office (EPO) is now granting biotechnology companies patents on all-natural crops such as broccoli, which was recently handed over as private property to Monsanto.

Broccoli compound shows promise in rodent model of breast cancer


In an article published online on August 2, 2012 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Shivendra V. Singh, PhD or the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and colleagues report a benefit for phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a compound that occurs in broccoli, watercress and other cruciferous vegetables, in retarding the progression of mammary cancer in mice.


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