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Bacteria

Keeping gut bacteria in balance could help delay age-related diseases, UCLA study finds

Reed Hutchinson/UCLA,, 10 SEP-2015
Why do some people remain healthy into their 80s and beyond, while others age faster and suffer serious diseases decades earlier?

Firebugs survive by harvesting nutrients from their gut flora

By Devon:(NaturalNews) Genetics are not a onetime deal, handed down through birth. Fate doesn't rest on genes alone. Nature is more interconnected than that; gene expression is influenced by proteins, enzymes, and bacterial hosts. Larger organisms are directly impacted by invisible hosts, the bacteria living inside.

3,000 different bacteria strains live on U.S. dollar bills


An analysis by New York University found 3,000 separate species of bacteria living on U.S. one-dollar bills, far more than had ever been detected in prior studies. Many of the species found are able to cause disease in humans, and many exhibited antibiotic resistance.

Good vs. bad bacteria - The flora war


How does consuming pesticide ruin your good bacteria in your gut that are responsible for maintaining 80% of your overall health, including your immunity? The answer is simple. An acidic environment starts the damage. Once your body is acidic, it welcomes inflammation, gastric issues and a weakened immune state. Your thymus is the biological seat of immunity. Did you know that sucralose shrinks the thymus and inflames the liver? Sucralose is the main ingredient in Splenda and Splenda Essentials (the toxic scam with vitamins on top). All of the other artificial sweeteners create a highly acidic system for you too. Add in some MSG and aspartame and what have you got? Major health problems that the allopathic doctors just can't seem to "solve." Their top-down approach using chemicals to treat only disease, when all you have is a few little eating "disorders" (bad choices), is absurd. It's obtuse. It's almost archaic, like bloodletting.

Health Basics: Xanthan gum is mutated corn sugar fermented with bacteria


Xanthan gum was discovered in the 1960s and was approved in 1968 as a food additive in the USA and Europe. It is mostly used as an emulsifier. It is made from bacteria that create black spots on broccoli and cauliflower. Xanthan gum at first is a slimy, gooey, fermented substance, but during processing it's dried up and finally ground into a fine white powder. You can bet your first and last mutated gene that the corn sugar used to make xanthan gum is not certified organic, but rather genetically modified.

Scientists create new cheeses cultured from feet and armpit bacteria


In a bizarre new twist on the term "stinky cheese," a pair of scientists from the U.K. recently unveiled a line of cheese products made from bacteria that they gathered from some of the smelliest parts of the human body. The main subjects of an unusual art and science project dubbed "Selfmade," the cheeses reportedly contained cultured bacteria collected from people's feet, bellybuttons, tears and even armpits.
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The Bacterial Menace That May Kill Millions


Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a growing health danger. If you have a bacterial infection that is incurable with antibiotics, conventional medicine can’t do much to clear it up. And in an alarming development, researchers are discovering antibiotic resistance is spreading and is now found in unexpected places.
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Expensive medications rendered useless by gut bacteria


The human body appears to have its own built-in safety mechanism for breaking down questionable pharmaceutical components and rendering them inactive. A recent study published in the journal Science reveals that gut flora, which naturally populate human intestines for digestive and immune system purposes, render useless the active drug compounds in some heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia medications, a mechanistic action that has baffled scientists for decades.