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Autism (HC)

'Copying' nerves broken in autism

Monday, 5 December 2005

Abnormal activity in neurons that help individuals imitate others may underlie some of the social deficits found in autism, US researchers believe.

A Nature Neuroscience study found autistic children had less brain activation in an area involved in understanding others' state of mind.

The degree of activation of the 'mirror neurons' housed in this area correlated with measures of social impairment.

The lower the activation, the stronger the impairment the children had.

Mirror neurons

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Autistic Boy's Death Raises Questions

By JENNIFER C. YATES, Associated Press Writer Fri Aug 26, 2005

PITTSBURGH - The death of a 5-year-old autistic boy has raised questions about whether a medical treatment aimed at cleaning the body of heavy metals should be used to treat the neurological and developmental disorder.

Officials said they do not know for sure what killed Abubakar Tariq Nadama, who went into cardiac arrest and died Tuesday after receiving his third chelation therapy treatment at a suburban medical clinic. State police were investigating.

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US health officials try to head off autism debate

Tue Jul 19, 2005

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Federal health officials affirmed the safety of vaccines on Tuesday in an unusual news conference called to counter a growing movement alleging that vaccines can cause autism.

Autism activists planned a rally in front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday to press their contention that the government has covered up evidence linking autism to a mercury-based product once used in vaccines.

They will also demand more research into autism, which they say is a growing problem.

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Low-Cost Therapy Shows Promise for Autism

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A form of therapy that focuses on parents' interactions with their children could help treat autism at a far lower cost than other strategies for the disorder, according to researchers.

Their study found that a therapy called responsive teaching, given over one year, led to gains in language and behavioral development among young children with autism or other pervasive developmental disorders -- a group of disorders marked by problems in the development of communication and social skills.

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Low-Cost Therapy Shows Promise for Autism

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A form of therapy that focuses on parents' interactions with their children could help treat autism at a far lower cost than other strategies for the disorder, according to researchers.

Their study found that a therapy called responsive teaching, given over one year, led to gains in language and behavioral development among young children with autism or other pervasive developmental disorders -- a group of disorders marked by problems in the development of communication and social skills.

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As autism cases soar, a search for clues

By Jacqueline Stenson

Contributing editor

MSNBC

Updated: 7:34 p.m. ET Feb. 23, 2005

Once a rare diagnosis, it seems there’s now an epidemic of autism sweeping the nation. Many of us know a child with the disorder, and concerned parents are searching for suspicious signs even in young babies. But while more kids are being labeled with autism, whether the condition is truly more common among today’s children than past generations of youngsters is largely unclear.

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AUTISM AND DETOXIFICATION

Might autistic children be the proverbial "canaries in the coal mine" whose nervous systems are more susceptible to the impact of toxic heavy metals in the environment incurring neurological damage even at low exposure levels? One recent study found that in one group of 18 autistic children 16 had blood levels of toxic heavy metals and chemicals exceeding adult maximum tolerance. This build-up of toxins may not arise simply from excessive exposure but from a marked inability to process and eliminate toxins from the body.

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Brain Inflammation Found in Autism

NEW YORK, NY -- November 15, 2004 -- Inflammation in the brain is clearly a feature of autism, according to a new study published November 15, 2004, in online edition of Annals of Neurology (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ana), the scientific journal of the American Neurological Association. The researchers found strong evidence that cer

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Autism and Vaccinations

By Mary Megson, MD

I have practiced pediatrics for twenty-two years, the last fifteen years seeing only children with developmental disabilities, which include learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, cerebral palsy, mental retardation and autism.

In 1978, I learned as a resident at Boston Floating Hospital that the incidence of autism was one in 10,000 children. Over the last ten years I have watched the incidence of autism skyrocket to 1/300-1/600 children.

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