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Autism (HC)

Parents want cattle prod used on son

March 9, 2007

BY STEVE PATTERSON Staff Reporter

Fran Bernstein wants what is best for her severely autistic, 48-year-old son.

So do those operating the Chicago group home where Bradley Bernstein lives.

But they disagree on what is the best way to respond when the stockily built Bradley begins a violent outburst.

His mother has long relied upon a small jolt from a cattle prod to calm her son down.

But disability advocacy groups, as well as the company running Bradley's group home, Trinity S

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The CDC: Centers for Deceit Control

According to organizations representing parents of autistic children, officials

at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) may have conspired to conceal data connecting the use of vaccines to developmental disorders in children. 

Groups such as the National Autism Association, Generation Rescue, A-Champ, NoMercury, Moms Against Mercury and AutismOne have long argued that a mercury-based chemical called thimerosal, used as a preservative in some vaccines, can cause children to develop autism. 

Recently, these groups sponsored a full-page ad in USA Today argu

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Roots of autism more complex than thought

By Liz Szabo, USA TODAY

A preliminary new study sheds light on the possible genetic roots of autism.

Experts say autism, a brain disorder that inhibits the ability to communicate and develop relationships, appears even more complex than doctors imagined.

The study, published Sunday in Nature Genetics, was led by the Autism Genome Project, a collaboration among researchers in 19 countries. The project was financed by the National Institutes of Health and the advocacy group Autism Speaks.

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Roots of autism more complex than thought

By Liz Szabo, USA TODAY

A preliminary new study sheds light on the possible genetic roots of autism.

Experts say autism, a brain disorder that inhibits the ability to communicate and develop relationships, appears even more complex than doctors imagined.

The study, published Sunday in Nature Genetics, was led by the Autism Genome Project, a collaboration among researchers in 19 countries. The project was financed by the National Institutes of Health and the advocacy group Autism Speaks.

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Autism-like disorder reversed in mice

Thursday, February 8, 2007

By Carey Goldberg, Globe Staff

It almost always strikes girls, in infancy. It can leave them unable to walk, talk or use their hands, racked by seizures or gasping for irregular breaths, with little prospect of improvement. But now the devastating symptoms of Rett Syndrome, a rare genetic disease related to autism, have been dramatically reversed in mice, raising a great wave of hope for families that previously had little.

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U.S. government to study autism

Mon Oct 9, 2006

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has announced a $5.9 million study in six states to try to find the causes of autism.

The study, the next of the agency's promised initiatives to look more closely at the disorder, would look for factors that may put children at risk for autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities, the CDC said.

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New Autism Study Shows Discrepancy in Brains

by Jon Hamilton 

All Things Considered, July 19, 2006 · Men and boys with autism have fewer neurons in a part of the brain involved in memory and emotion, according to a new study by scientists at the University of California in San Diego and the MIND Institute at UC Davis.

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Autism could affect twice as many children as previously believed

By Jeremy Laurance, Health Editor Published: 14 July 2006

Twice as many children may be affected by autism as had previously been thought, researchers claim today.

A survey conducted in 12 districts in south London suggests 1 per cent of children in Britain - about 100,000 - are affected by the lifelong developmental disability that impairs the way people communicate with each other. More than three times as many boys as girls are affected.

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Autism explained by weak brain links

LONDON, April 10, 2006 (UPI) -- Poor communication between brain areas in people with autism may give clues to difficulties they have in relating with other people, a study has found.

As the weak links mean they benefit less from social situations, it may explain why they do not interact well, said the study published in Neuroimage, the BBC reported Sunday.

Researchers from the University of London compared brain scans of 16 people with autism spectrum disorders, or ASD, and above-average IQs, as well as 16 volunteers unaffected by ASD.

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MRI Scans Find Larger Brains in Children With Autism

By Peggy Peck, Managing Editor, MedPage Today
Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
December 09, 2005

Review
CHAPEL HILL, N.C., Dec. 9 - MRI scans indicate that the brains of children with autism are larger than those of healthy children, suggesting an unusual pattern of brain growth that may have its onset in shortly before a child's first birthday.

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