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Arthritis

Vitamin D May Help Arthritic Knees Function Better

Wed Oct 20, 2004

By Martha Kerr

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Boston researchers report a link between low serum levels of vitamin D and decreased knee function in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

At the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in San Antonio, Dr. David Felson of Boston University presented his team's findings from 221 subjects recruited from the Boston VA Medical Center. All had knee arthritis and reported knee pain on most days in the month before they joined the study.

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Arthritis Patients Stay Strong After Training

Tue Aug 3, 2004

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The benefit of an exercise program in terms of stronger muscles seems to be long lasting.

Follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis shows that muscle strength gained during an earlier exercise program was maintained three years later, Finnish researchers report.

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Arthritis Patients Stay Strong After Training

Tue Aug 3, 2004

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The benefit of an exercise program in terms of stronger muscles seems to be long lasting.

Follow-up of patients with rheumatoid arthritis shows that muscle strength gained during an earlier exercise program was maintained three years later, Finnish researchers report.

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Vitamin C Rich Diet May Cut Arthritis Risk

Reuters Health

By Anthony J. Brown, MD

Friday, June 11, 2004

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Consumption of foods high in vitamin C appears to protect against inflammatory polyarthritis, a form of rheumatoid arthritis involving two or more joints, new research suggests.

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Too Much Vitamin C May Be Bad for Arthritis

Thu Jun 3, 2004

By Will Boggs, MD

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Prolonged exposure to high doses of vitamin C seems to make osteoarthritis worse, according to findings from a study involving guinea pigs. This suggests that people should not exceed the recommended dietary allowance for vitamin C.

Previous short-term studies have indicated that vitamin C might be protective against osteoarthritis, but long-term treatment with vitamin C has not been studied, the researchers note in the medical journal Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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U.S. Worried by High Rates of Arthritis

Thu May 13, 2004

By Paul Simao

ATLANTA (Reuters) - Approximately one-quarter of American adults have been diagnosed with arthritis and another 17 percent may be suffering from the crippling disease, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday.

Arthritis, a musculoskeletal disease that causes painful inflammation in the joints, is the leading cause of disability in the United States and a major financial drain on the nation's health care system.

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Chopstick Use May Promote Hand Arthritis

Thu May 6, 2004

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A lifetime of using chopsticks may raise the risk of developing arthritis in certain joints of the hand, according to a study of older adults in China.

Among more than 2,500 men and women age 60 and older, researchers found that the prevalence of arthritis was greater in the thumb and fingers people used to manipulate the utensils than in their other hand joints.

The relationship was particularly strong in women, the study authors report in the May issue of the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism.

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Tetracyclines Could Be an Overlooked Option for Rheumatoid Arthritis

ProHealthNetwork.com

11-24-2003 Tetracyclines, especially minocycline, reduce disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to results of a metaanalysis published in the Journal of Rheumatology for October.

Investigators in Ontario, Canada, reviewed 10 randomized controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of tetracyclines to either placebo or conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) for the prevention or reduction of disease activity in a total of 535 RA patients.

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Outlook Improved Since 80s for Arthritis Sufferers

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The rates of hospitalization to treat severe complications of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) declined between 1983 and 2001, according to an investigator at the US National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases.

"These findings suggest that since the early 1980s, the long-term health outcomes of patients with RA have improved," Dr. Michael M. Ward reports in the medical journal Arthritis and Rheumatism.

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SAMe Powerful intervention for Arthritis, Liver Health and Neurochemistry.

What is SAMe?

SAMe is the most active of all methyl donors. Our body naturally makes SAMe from methionine from protein rich foods. SAMe is a naturally occurring metabolite found in the human body. The adrenals, pineal gland and the liver contain the highest concentrations of SAMe in humans. It is produced in the normal physiology from the amino acid methionine in the presence of the cofactors B12 (the methylcobalamin form) and folate. Half of all methionine in the body is used in the liver to make SAMe.

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