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Arthritis

Do You Have Degenerative Arthritis?

With 10 million or more people with arthritis, the majority of them will have degenerative arthritis. This arthritis is called Osteoarthritis. Degenerative arthritis occurs when joints are overworked, rub against each other, experience excess friction, and slowly degenerate.

Most joints rub against each other, but bone joints have a protective layer called cartilage. This cartilage has no blood vessels or nerves so it cannot receive nutrients directly. This cartilage serves as a cushion or pad between bones so that bones don't wear out and so you don't feel pain.

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Arthritis Symptoms You Should Know About

Many people have arthritis symptoms and don't realize it. It takes a while to get full blown arthritis. It's something that gradually builds up and before you know it, you have arthritis and are seeing your doctor for medication. Any medication you take does not address the cause of arthritis and will not improve your condition.

If you show any arthritis symptoms, then expect to have arthritis 4-10 year down the road. Typically when people have symptoms, they just ignore them and actual don't recognize them as arthritis symptoms.

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Eating fruits and vegetables may cut arthritis risk

Wed Aug 17, 2005

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Drinking a glass of orange juice a day may help stave off arthritis, new research suggests. Certain carotenoids, compounds commonly found in some fruits and vegetables, appear to be responsible.

The findings from previous studies have suggested that dietary carotenoids, the chemicals responsible for the orange and yellow coloring of fruits and vegetables, can reduce inflammation through antioxidant effects.

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Rheumatoid arthritis severity similar in both sexes

Thu Aug 18, 2005

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - While women with rheumatoid arthritis outnumber men, the results of a recent French study indicate that sex has little effect on the severity of the disease. Nonetheless, women more frequently undergo joint surgery.

In a study published in the Journal of Rheumatology, Dr. Laure Gossec, of Hopital Cochin, in Paris, and colleagues compared 133 male rheumatoid arthritis patients with 133 female patients with the same disease duration, about seven years.

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Eating fruits and vegetables may cut arthritis risk

Wed Aug 17, 2005

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Drinking a glass of orange juice a day may help stave off arthritis, new research suggests. Certain carotenoids, compounds commonly found in some fruits and vegetables, appear to be responsible.

The findings from previous studies have suggested that dietary carotenoids, the chemicals responsible for the orange and yellow coloring of fruits and vegetables, can reduce inflammation through antioxidant effects.

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Vigorous Activity May Lessen Arthritis Disability

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older people with arthritis are more likely to hang on to good physical function if they exercise on a regular basis, a new study suggests.

In a two-year study of more than 5,700 older adults with arthritis, researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago found that men and women who were consistently active were less likely to develop physical limitations that interfered with their day-to-day lives.

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Osteoarthritis Improves with Self-Management Program

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Patients who participated in a cognitive-behavioral-based program to help manage their arthritis had sustained improvements in pain and daily functioning in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee, Dutch investigators report in the Journal of Rheumatology.

The intervention involved six 2-hour sessions led by two physiotherapists, during which patients were taught goal-setting to optimize activity levels, self-relaxation for pain control, self-diagnostic skills and problem solving.

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Increased Arthritis Pain May Be Due to Fracture

Fri Dec 24, 2004

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Patients with rheumatoid arthritis who have an increase in pain at a single site could be suffering from a stress fracture, especially if they have a history of steroid use, UK researchers report in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

As senior investigator Dr. Philip N. Platt told Reuters Health, "pain in limbs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis is not always due to their joint disease directly.

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Arthritic Joints Stand Up to Intensive Exercise

Wed Nov 3, 2004

By Will Boggs, MD

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Long-term high-intensity exercise does not accelerate the progression of joint damage in the hands and feet of people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to a Dutch report.

Exercise known to benefit arthritis patients, increasing their physical capacity, functional ability, and emotional, the researchers explain in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. However, little is known about the effects of exercise on damage to the small joints of the hands and feet.

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Canadian Study Says Glucosamine No Arthritis Help

Wed Oct 27, 2004

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (Reuters) - Glucosamine, a popular food supplement used by arthritis sufferers to prevent painful flare-ups, has no long-term benefit, Canadian researchers said on Wednesday.

The University of British Columbia researchers found that 45 percent of glucosamine users still suffered arthritis attacks during a six-month period, compared with only 42 percent who were given a placebo.

"Our study shows that even if the supplement was initially perceived by s

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