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Animal Rights

Elephant Sanctuary Story - Associated Press

By COLIN FLY

Associated Press Writer

HOHENWALD, Tenn. (AP) _ Only the tops of Sissy and Winkie's heads
poke above the water at their swimming hole.  

A minute passes, Winkie nudges Sissy and they both come up for air.
Seconds later, Sissy goes under the water again, this time for about two
minutes.  

But she can't hold her breath in their contest much longer, so she
sticks out her gray snout and sprays water over herself and pachyderm

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Animal Rights Group to Sue Fast-Food Chain

July 7, 2003

By ELIZABETH BECKER

WASHINGTON, July 6 — People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals said today that it would sue the KFC Corporation in Los Angeles on Monday as part of the group's six-month boycott to seek an improvement in the way 700 million chickens are raised and slaughtered every year for the fast-food giant.

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Trying to save a catfish as big as a bear

December 1, 2003

The Mekong giant catfish can grow in excess of 650 pounds and nearly 10 feet.

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) -- Zeb Hogan plunges into the muddy brown waters of the Tonle Sap River and grabs hold of a 321-pound silvery giant catfish that has just slid out of a blue tarp held by several Cambodian fisherman.

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Bloody Animal Trade Thrives in Post-SARS China

October 26, 2003

GUANGZHOU, China (Reuters) - Two little boys giggle as they play hide and seek among hundreds of filthy cages packed tight with civet cats, dogs, porcupines and squirrels.

Health experts fear that wild animal markets like this one in southern China's Baiyun district could be the source of the next SARS epidemic that many fear will emerge this winter, but traders and workers here could not be more oblivious.

Amid the stench of death and decay, traders of exotic animals -- a culinary delight for

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Animals 'are moral beings'

By Alex Kirby

BBC News Online environment correspondent 

Some animals can feel and think in ways not too dissimilar from us, welfare campaigners say.  The weight of scientific opinion is that it's certainly right to give the benefit of the doubt to all vertebrates

by Dr James Kirkwood, Ufaw

They say there is evidence of altruism, with some animals acting disinterestedly for the good of others.

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GRAND JURY REPRESSION

from AR-News 

Organizers of the conference "Revolutionary Environmentalism: A Dialogue Between Activists and Academics," have criticized Fresno State University for acceding to a grand jury subpoena for videotape of their gathering. The February conference, included animal rights groups and others that have employed militant tactics. Fresno State officials said they supplied a videotape of one conference session (which was open to the student body and the media) to the grand jury.

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BEEF INDUSTRY'S DIRTY SECRET: U.S. LAGS ON SAFETY STANDARDS

The Wall Street Journal, Health Journal, Tara Parker-Pope

May 27, 2003

When a mad cow was found in Canada last week, the government and cattle industry were quick to play down the risk to the rest of us. That's understandable. After all, the known risks of contracting mad-cow disease are immeasurably small -- one cow in Canada doesn't change that. In addition, if you're listing the risks associated with eating beef, you would have to put heart disease and colon cancer well above mad-cow disease. 

But don't chow down on that burger just yet.

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Chimps May Have Closer Links to Humans

May 20, 2003

By RANDOLPH E. SCHMID, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - It may be time to move over and share the human branch of the family tree with chimpanzees, says a researcher who has studied how closely the two are related.

Humans and chimps share 99.4 percent of DNA — genetic code for life — according to a team led by Morris Goodman of the Wayne State University School of Medicine.

"We humans appear as only slightly remodeled chimpanzee-like apes," said Goodman.

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Nature Body Suggests Iceland Wants Whales for Meat

Thu Aug 7, 2003

GENEVA (Reuters) - Iceland's decision to resume whaling for what it calls scientific purposes after a 14-year break is driven by commercial concerns, the conservation body WWF-International suggested on Thursday.

The program, aimed at catching 38 minke whales in August and September, is simply "an excuse to expand whaling," said the World Wide Fund for Nature which has led campaigning in the past two decades to save all whale species from extinction.

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