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Alzheimer

Common Bacteria Linked to Alzheimer's

ProHealthNetwork.com

03-11-2004

The paper “Chlamydia pneumoniae induces Alzheimer-like Amyloid Plaques in Brains of BALB/c Mice,” to be published in the April issue of Neurolobiology of Aging shows a link between the bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae and the amyloid plaques found in the brains of people who have sporadic, non-hereditary Alzheimer’s Disease.

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Build Health: Want To Prevent Alzheimer's?

Build Health: Want To Prevent Alzheimer's?

Copyright 2004 William R. Quesnell

For one option to prevent Alzheimer's, the progressive memory loss and mental deterioration associated with brain damage, you can try this:

Place blind faith in the conventional research establishment, an outfit that for 40 years has been hot on the trail of a cure for cancer, but has come up empty. Here's their present focus:

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Common Bacteria Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

Fri Mar 19, 2004

FRIDAY, March 19 (HealthDayNews) -- There's a link between the common respiratory bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae and amyloid plaques found in the brains of people with non-hereditary Alzheimer's disease.

That's the news from a study by researchers at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine's Center for the Study of Chronic Diseases of Aging.

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Common Bacteria Linked to Alzheimer's Disease

FRIDAY, March 19 (HealthDayNews) -- There's a link between the common respiratory bacteria Chlamydia pneumoniae and amyloid plaques found in the brains of people with non-hereditary Alzheimer's disease.

That's the news from a study by researchers at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine's Center for the Study of Chronic Diseases of Aging.

The research in mice appears in the April issue of the journal Neurobiology of Aging.

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A Nose for Alzheimer's?

Fri Mar 12, 2004

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, March 12 (HealthDayNews) -- Mice left unimpressed by "meadow fresh," "golden forest" and other sweet aromas are helping scientists sniff out a test to diagnose Alzheimer's disease in its earliest stages.

According to researchers, the sense of smell is one of the first casualties of the disease as it begins its cell-by-cell assault on the human brain. A smell-based early detection test might let patients be treated earlier and more effectively, they say.

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New Study Underscores Alzheimer’s Association’s Call For Americans To “Maintain Your Brain”

ProHealthNetwork.com

03-01-2004 Chicago — A study published online by the British Medical Journal (bmj.com) finds that women with type 2 diabetes suffer greater cognitive decline than women without diabetes and have worse cognitive function. The researchers consider cognitive decline an intermediate stage prior to dementia. Women not using any medication to treat their diabetes had the greatest odds of poor performance compared with women without diabetes.

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Metal Chelation Therapy May Ease Alzheimer's Disease

01-19-2004

By Jennifer Warner
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD on Monday, December 15, 2003

Dec. 15, 2003 -- A new approach in treating Alzheimer's disease may help improve mental functioning in those with the most severe forms of the disease.

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New Marker for Alzheimer's Found

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 5 (HealthDayNews) -- A potential brain biologic marker for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease has been identified by scientists at Berlex Pharmaceuticals.

A receptor protein molecule called CCR1 that's usually found on the surface of white blood cells is also present in the brains of people with Alzheimer's, they say. They also found that increasing levels of CCR1 in the brain correlate with the progression of the disease.

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Scientists Turn to Sage to Combat Alzheimers

Thu Aug 28, 2003

LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists searching for a cure for Alzheimer's disease have found a potential ally in the humble herb sage.

Alzheimer's is one of the most common forms of dementia, affecting some 10 million people worldwide, making it one of the hottest areas of pharmaceutical research.

Checking the writings of herbalists working four centuries ago, scientists at the northern English universities of Newcastle and Northumbria found a marked improvement in

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Synthetic Dope Helps Alzheimer's Patients

(HealthDay is the new name for HealthScoutNews.)

THURSDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDayNews) -- A synthetic version of the active ingredient in marijuana may reduce agitation and promote weight gain in people with Alzheimer's disease.

A recent study of 48 people with Alzheimer's found 66 percent of them experienced significant improvement in agitation and 33 percent of them had functional improvement after a month of treatment with dronabinol.

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