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Alzheimer

Constant Worry May Increase Alzheimer's Risk

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who have a tendency to worry or feel very stressed out may be more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease later in life, new research reports.

The relationship between stress and Alzheimer's disease also appears to be much stronger in whites than in African-Americans, the authors note in the journal Neurology.

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University of Minnesota researchers to study vitamin E as Alzheimer's Treatment

U-WIRE

26 Jan 2005

(U-WIRE) MINNEAPOLIS -- Researchers at the University of Minnesota will receive $8.1 million to study the effects of vitamin E on people suffering from mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

"Our population is aging, and increased age is one of the major risk factors for developing Alzheimer's disease," said Maurice Dysken, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center Geriatric Research, Education & Clinical Center director and University psychiatry professor.

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Smell Test May Predict Alzheimer's - U.S. Study

Dec 13, 2004

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A simple scratch and sniff test may help doctors identify patients with Alzheimer's disease, researchers said on Monday.

They found that patients with early Alzheimer's disease may be unable to smell certain odors, including strawberry, smoke, soap and cloves.

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Blacks More Prone to Alzheimer's Disease

Sun Jan 30, 2005

By Janice Billingsley
HealthDay Reporter

SUNDAY, Jan. 30 (HealthDayNews) -- Alzheimer's disease is a silent epidemic striking black Americans, who seem more susceptible to the brain-wasting condition than any other group of Americans, new research finds.

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Science Makes Strides Toward Alzheimer's Cure

Fri Dec 24, 2004

By Holly VanScoy
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Dec. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A new element has emerged in the seemingly never-ending battle against Alzheimer's disease: hope.

While no one presented a breakthrough along the lines of a Salk vaccine, many of the professionals who attended the ninth international conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Philadelphia this past summer predicted a viable treatment within the next 10 years.

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Smell Test May Predict Alzheimer's, Study Shows

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A simple scratch and sniff test may help doctors identify patients with Alzheimer's disease, researchers said on Monday.

They found that patients with early Alzheimer's disease may be unable to smell certain odors, including strawberry, smoke, soap and cloves.

"Early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is critical for patients and their families to receive the most beneficial treatment and medications," said Dr. Davangere Devanand, a professor of psychiatry and neurology at New York's Columbia University, who led the study.

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Draining Brain Toxins May Slow Alzheimer's

TUESDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDayNews) -- Reducing levels of specific toxins in the brain may help stabilize cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease patients.

That's the finding of preliminary research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, published in the August issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

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Bypasses suspected in brain disease

By JOHN FAUBER

July 19, 2004

Philadelphia - For years, doctors have known that many people who undergo heart surgery experience temporary memory problems, but a provocative new study suggests they also may be at greater risk for developing Alzheimer's disease.

Looking at a group of about 9,000 people who underwent either coronary artery bypass graft or angioplasty, researchers found that bypass surgery increased the risk of later developing Alzheimer's by 70%.

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Progress on Alzheimer's Dramatic - Researcher

Thu Jul 22, 2004

By Jon Hurdle

PHILADELPHIA (Reuters) - A cure for Alzheimer's disease is unlikely in the near future, but big advances are coming soon in the treatment and prevention of the fatal brain illness, a leading researcher said on Thursday.

Researchers have made strides in learning about causes and possible therapies, and just in time, too, as the burden of Alzheimer's threatens Medicare, said Dr. William Thies, vice president for medical and scientific affairs at the Alzheimer's Association.

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