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Alzheimer

Word test may give clues to Alzheimer's disease

Tue Sep 6, 2005

By Patricia Reaney

DUBLIN (Reuters) - Could a simple word test be used to identify people who might be suffering from the very early stages of Alzheimer's disease? British scientists think so.

Results of a study presented at a science conference on Tuesday revealed that people in the first stages of the incurable illness cannot write down as many animals and fruits in one-minute period as healthy individuals.

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ALZHEIMER'S: A speedy way to be diagnosed

Medical researchers can be a funny breed. In their search for the secrets of health, they can come up with the strangest findings and present them with a straight face.

One study group has been trying to discover early signs of Alzheimer's, and so took some likely candidates for a drive. Tell-tale signs included missing a large speed limit sign, which suggests that anyone who speeds may have Alzheimer's. 

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Patients Misdiagnosed As Having Alzheimer's Can Get Their Life Back

It is a disease similar to Alzheimer's, but this one has a treatment that can give patients years of their life back.

Alzheimer's is a debilitating disease that affects patients and also those who love them. But what if the symptoms of Alzheimer's were really those of another disease?

Here's the story of a man who was misdiagnosed and missed 20 years of his life.

Milton Newman has always had a lot to sing about. He was a stage performer, but one day, the singing stopped.

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Alzheimer's toxin may be key to slowing disease

Thu Aug 4, 2005

SYDNEY (Reuters) - Australian scientists say they have identified a toxin which plays a key role in the onset of Alzheimer's, raising hope that a drug targeting the toxin could be developed to slow the degenerative brain disease.

The toxin, called quinolinic acid, kills nerve cells in the brain, leading to dysfunction and death, the scientists said.

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Alzheimer's workshop stresses mind-body workouts

Mon Jun 20, 2005

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Can you remember a new telephone number 10 seconds after hearing it? Do you walk 10,000 steps a day and eat plenty of fruits and vegetables?

A new workshop put together by the Alzheimer's Association says mental, physical and social workouts are the best ways to lower the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

While new drugs and therapies offer some promise for the brain-destroying disease, there is no cure for Alzheimer's and not even a good treatment.

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Exercise Slows Alzheimer's in Mice

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Regular exercise can slow the development of Alzheimer's disease by changing the way brain-damaging proteins take up residence in the brain, researchers said Wednesday.

Their study of mice helps explain a growing body of evidence that keeping busy, physically and mentally, and eating certain foods can delay or even prevent the brain-destroying illness.

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Brain's Own Stem Cells Might Fight Alzheimer's

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) - Like many neurodegenerative illnesses, Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the uncontrolled death of precious brain cells. But in their unique ability to develop into any cell type, stem cells have long held out the tantalizing hope of replenishing neurons lost to the disease, a process called neurogenesis.

Unfortunately, transplanting these stem cells from outside sources -- such as embryos or bone marrow -- carries its own risks and complications.

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Brain's Own Stem Cells Might Fight Alzheimer's

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, March 14 (HealthDay News) - Like many neurodegenerative illnesses, Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the uncontrolled death of precious brain cells. But in their unique ability to develop into any cell type, stem cells have long held out the tantalizing hope of replenishing neurons lost to the disease, a process called neurogenesis.

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Healthy Lifestyle Could Reduce Alzheimer's Risk

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) - Regular exercise and a healthy diet could go a long way to reducing the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a medical expert said on Thursday.

A recent Finnish study showed that middle-aged people taking regular exercise at least twice a week could reduce their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease by 50 percent in old age, neurologist Miia Kivipelto said at a conference in Amsterdam.

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Nursing Home Drug May Speed Alzheimer's

Thu Feb 17, 2005

THURSDAY, Feb. 17 (HealthDay News) -- The antipsychotic drug quetiapine, commonly used to treat agitation and other symptoms in people with Alzheimer's living in nursing homes, greatly speeds up cognitive decline, says a study published online in the British Medical Journal.

Researchers tracked 93 dementia patients for six months. Some people were given quetiapine (brand name Seroquel), some took a placebo and others were given another antipsychotic drug called rivastigmine (Exelon).

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