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Allergies (HC articles)

Bird Flu – Get your facts right

You would have heard about Bird Flu in the news, on your television and from your friends. Large numbers of birds, especially poultry, have been culled in many countries in South east Asia. You may even have heard about Tamiflu, a prescription drug approved by FDA in October 1999 and marketed by Roche Laboratories used to treat Avian flu infection. It has been known that production of Tamiflu, all over the world, is not enough to treat everyone, was Bird Flu to take on pandemic proportions among humans.

Food Dystopia: Low Blood Sugar

Are you grumpy before meals? Do you avoid meetings in mid-afternoon because you can’t concentrate? Is your family complaining about your moodiness? Are you carrying an extra 25 pounds?

If so, blame your diet. The food you and thousands of Americans are eating is making you sick and overweight. And it could be harming your children, too.

For allergy sufferers, it's the opening act

Trees aren't the only thing blooming right now in New England. There's a bumper crop of robust sneezes, crimson eyes, and drippy noses, too.

'You're so happy to see spring, but then you go, 'Oh, God, the pollen's out,' " said Janet Willis, an inveterate allergy sufferer from Hancock, N.H.

By late last week, tree pollen levels were soaring. And guess what? This is only the opening act.

Health Tip: Makeup May Aggravate Allergies

October 6, 2005

(HealthDay News) -- For centuries, women have been using makeup to look and feel beautiful. But makeup can also cause ugly allergic reactions, such as redness or blisters.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers these suggestions to minimize your risk:

* Tighten makeup lids when not in use.
* Wash your hands before putting on makeup.
* Don't share makeup with others.
* Don't add liquid to your makeup.
* Discontinue use if your skin breaks out.

Most Americans have allergies

Wed Aug 17, 2005

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - More than half (54.3 percent) of the U.S. population is sensitive to one or more common allergens, placing them at increased risk for the development of asthma, hay fever, and eczema.

The highest prevalence rates were for dust mite, rye, ragweed, and cockroach, with about 25 percent of the population testing positive to each allergen. Roughly 18 percent reacted to Bermuda grass, 17 percent to cat, 15 percent to Russian thistle, and 13 percent to white oak and mold.

Eczema: Tips On How To Care For Your Skin

Eczema can best be described as a non-contagious skin condition, which is characterized by hot dry itchy skin, with symptoms that often fluctuate seasonally and even over the course of the day. Eczema typically begins in early childhood. Research indicates that eczema may be genetically determined and studies show that there is often a family history of allergies, asthma, eczema or hay fever. Children who experience eczema may also suffer from asthma or hay fever as well.

Eczema: Tips On How To Care For Your Skin

Eczema can best be described as a non-contagious skin condition, which is characterized by hot dry itchy skin, with symptoms that often fluctuate seasonally and even over the course of the day. Eczema typically begins in early childhood. Research indicates that eczema may be genetically determined and studies show that there is often a family history of allergies, asthma, eczema or hay fever. Children who experience eczema may also suffer from asthma or hay fever as well. 

Sesame Allergy Is a Growing Problem

By Jennifer Warner
WebMD Medical News

Reviewed By Brunilda  Nazario, MD
on Wednesday, July 20, 2005

July 20, 2005 -- Despite the growing number of people who are allergic to sesame seed products, a new study suggests awareness of this type of food allergy still lags far behind other common food allergies.

Air Duct Filters And Fighting Allergies

Allergies are an unpleasant fact of life for many today. The symtoms are all too common including, sneezing, coughing, runny nose, breathing difficulties, skin inflammations, and more. A true allergy sufferer knows how difficult it is to deal with these symptoms on a daily basis

If your allergy is to airborne elements, you are really at the mercy of changing winds, weather, and seasons too when you are outdoors.