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Alcohol

CDC: American Alcohol, Health Ideas Wrong

Tue Apr 19, 2005

By DANIEL YEE, Associated Press Writer

ATLANTA - The government Tuesday warned that a few drinks a day may not protect against strokes and heart attacks after all.

Some studies in recent years have touted the health benefits of moderate drinking. Some have even said that up to four drinks a day can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease in people 40 and older.

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Wine or Beer? Both Equal Higher Blood Pressure

Mon Apr 18, 2005

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Red wine might be considered good for overall health, but it raises blood pressure nearly as much as beer does, Australian researchers reported on Monday.

People at risk of high blood pressure should not switch to red wine in the hope of being able to drink more, they concluded.

"A positive relationship between alcohol consumption and blood pressure is well established, but the relative effect of specific alcoholic beverages is controversial," said R

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People Drinking More - But at Home

By Karen Attwood, PA

Alcohol consumption increased last year, but people were drinking more at home rather than in bars, restaurants and pubs, according to statistics released today.

People ate out less and households were consuming less overall, the National Statistics study for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs revealed.

But the consumption of fruit and vegetables fell despite the Government’s strong message to eat at least five portions a day.

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Health Tip: Drinking and Pregnancy

(HealthDay News) -- Drinking alcohol while you are pregnant can cause your baby to be born with a series of physical and mental birth defects called fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). It's a leading cause of mental retardation.

No one knows exactly how much alcohol a woman has to drink to cause FAS in her baby (and that level may be different among women). So experts agree that the best thing to do is not to drink alcohol at all while you are pregnant -- that includes beer, wine, wine coolers and liquor.

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Heavy Drinking More Common on Campus Than Off -Study

Mon Mar 7, 2005

CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. college students drink more alcohol and are more likely to binge drink than young adults who are not in college, but the nonstudents are more likely to be dependent on alcohol, a study said Monday.

Other studies have found that college students are more likely to take part in heavy or binge drinking than peers in the same age group who do not attend college.

The 2001 survey of 6,300 people aged 19 to 21 found 18 percent of college students reported alcohol-related problems compared to 15 percent of those not in college.

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Sloshed!

By: Bob Drury Illustration by: Nathan Fox

 

What havoc did New Years Eve and all those office parties wreak?

Men's Health sent an intrepid reporter, as a public service mind you, to simulate a round of end-of-the-year partying. Indulge the way we all do during those dizzying two weeks between December 15 and New Year's Eve, and see what really happens inside your body. It's not a wives' tale...

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Alcohol, Tobacco Pose Equal Burden on Global Health

Thu Feb 3, 2005

By Patricia Reaney

LONDON (Reuters) - When it comes to causing death and disability, alcoholic drinks are as bad as tobacco and high blood pressure.

Alcohol is linked to more than 60 different medical conditions, including oral, liver and breast cancers, heart disease, stroke and cirrhosis. It also increases the risk of car accidents, drowning, falls and homicides.

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Alcohol Acts on Blood Vessels to Promote Cancer

Mon Dec 13, 2004

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Previous reports have suggested that alcohol use helps cancers grow and now, new research offers a possible explanation for this phenomenon.

Rather than affecting the cancer directly, alcohol seems to work by promoting the growth of blood vessels that feed the tumor, according to a report in the medical journal Cancer.

The findings are based on tests conducted in chick embryos harboring human cancer cells.

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Danish Kids Drunkest in Europe, Turks Most Sober

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Danish youngsters get drunk most, their Czech peers like to smoke cannabis, the Irish are more prone to binge-drinking and young Turks are the cleanest-living in Europe, according to a new survey.

The European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs (ESPAD), looking at the drinking, smoking and drug-taking habits of youngsters around the age of 16 from 35 countries in 2003, was released on Tuesday.

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