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Alcohol

Alarm raised on teen alcohol abuse

From Wednesday's Globe and Mail

When Rebekah Grant was 11 years old, it took only a sip of wine with her parents for her to feel a buzz. By 13, she found herself needing more like a couple of glasses to get the same result.

Now, the 15-year-old says she can tolerate alcohol better than her parents can.

"I would get pissed [drunk] with just one sip back then," said the teen, who is visiting Toronto from Scotland. "I wish it was still the same now."

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ALCOHOLISM IS A FOUR FOLD PROGRESSIVE DISEASE

Alcoholism is a disease of the body, thinking, emotions and spirit. Progressive damage to these four aspects interact in various ways such that a person is increasingly compelled to drink. Also, once drinking starts they cannot ‘always’ guarantee when they will stop or how much they will drink.

The Body

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ALCOHOLISM IS A FOUR FOLD PROGRESSIVE DISEASE

Alcoholism is a disease of the body, thinking, emotions and spirit. Progressive damage to these four aspects interact in various ways such that a person is increasingly compelled to drink. Also, once drinking starts they cannot ‘always’ guarantee when they will stop or how much they will drink.

The Body

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Alcohol abuse increasing: study

August 25, 2006

High risk drinking is on the rise and women are picking up the habit at the fastest rate, new figures show.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) says about one in eight adults - about two million Australians - drink at a risky or high risk level in a typical week.

And the proportion putting their health at risk has increased over the past decade from 8.2 per cent in 1995 to 10.8 per cent in 2001 and 13.4 per cent in the most recent 2004-2005 survey.

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Britain's 'dangerous addiction to alcohol' revealed

By JAMES SLACK, Daily Mail 15:48pm 4th August 2006

Experts today warned Britain's 'addiction to alcohol' is swamping hospitals, reducing life expectancy and fuelling violent brawls.

The report by the Centre for Public Health is the most devastating account yet of how alcohol is destroying the nation's fabric.

Academics said the country had gone from 'enjoying a harmless tipple' to a 'dangerous alcohol addiction.'

The Government must either change its policies or 'reap the toll of mental and physical wreckage', they warned.

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Early drinking may speed alcohol dependence

Thu Jul 6, 2006

By Anne Harding

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who begin to drink alcohol before the age of 14 years are not only more likely to become alcoholics than those who stay away from alcohol until they're 21; they also develop dependence on alcohol faster, and face a longer struggle with alcohol throughout their lives, a new study shows.

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Coffee Drinking Associated With Lower Risk For Alcohol-related Liver Disease

15 Jun 2006

Drinking coffee may be related to a reduced risk of developing the liver disease alcoholic cirrhosis, according to a report in the June issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

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Irish spend most on alcohol in EU

Posted: Fri 02/06/2006]

By Deborah Condon

People in Ireland spend a higher proportion of their income on alcohol than any other country in the EU, a major new report has found.

According to the report, the average Irish household spends €1,675 per year on alcohol. This is three times the amount spent by the next country on the list - Denmark at €531. (This referred to the original 15 EU members prior to enlargement.)

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Britain and Ireland top boozing league

Jun 1, 2006

Britain is third in a list of European binge-drinkers, while Ireland has been given the dubious honour of coming top.

A European Union (EU)-wide survey on alcohol consumption conducted by UK-based Institute of Alcohol Studies and funded by the European Commission found that British adults went on binges an average of 28 times a year.

That represents a drinking session once every 13 days, leaving Britain behind only the Irish and the Finns in the continent. The Italians, on the other hand, go bingeing four times less frequently than Britons.

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Just two drinks a week may lower unborn child's IQ

Fri May 26, 2006

By Megan Rauscher

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For pregnant women, even a few alcoholic beverages per week during the first or second trimester can have harmful consequences on the cognitive development of the unborn child.

A long-term study has found that 10-year-old African-American children who were exposed to between two to six drinks per week during pregnancy, particularly in the second trimester, had a lower IQ compared with children who were not exposed to alcohol while in the womb.

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