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AIDS

Antiretroviral Use May Stamp Out HIV Epidemic

Fri Aug 2, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Widespread use of antiretroviral drug combinations together with a decrease in risky sexual behaviors could eradicate an HIV epidemic, even in locations where as many as 30% of the population is infected, according to researchers who created a mathematical model. However, it would likely take 100 years.

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AIDS: A Federal Virus to Eliminate or Debilitate People of Color (proven)

BELOW IS A SCIENCE PAPER THAT CONFIRMS A RACIAL COMPONENT TO THE NUCLEOTIDE SEQUENCES OF HIV/AIDS. HIV/AIDS SEEKS A RECEPTOR SITE (CCR5 DELTA 32 POSITIVE) THAT ALL BLACK PEOPLE HAVE. WITH THE MUTATION RATE OF HIV/AIDS IT IS CONCEIVABLE THAT EVENTUALLY THROUGH THE AIR, ALL BLACK PEOPLE CAN DIE.

PLEASE UNDERSTAND THE 20TH CENTURY FROM THEIR HISTORY:

1902- An African American biological germ.

1910-Francis Peyton Rous 'discovers cancer' in chickens. (U.S. reports in 1978, Rous Sarcoma was man made). however,

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HIV-Protective Gene May Boost Hepatitis C Infection

Wed Jul 17, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Patients with a gene variation that protects them from HIV infection may be more prone to developing the liver infection hepatitis C, German researchers report.

Hepatitis C is a viral infection of the liver that is transmitted through contact with infected blood. Many people with hepatitis C are unaware of the infection and remain symptom-free for years, although some eventually develop cirrhosis of the liver.

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It's Hard to Kill Stones

IT'S HARD TO KILL SOMETHING ALREADY DEAD

by Karl Loren

Government scientists get billions of dollars to research how to kill stones!

It's true. Most people can reasonably agree that stones and mountains of rock are not alive and that it would be fruitless to spend money figuring out how to kill them.

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Painful Bone Problem More Common in HIV Patients

Tue Jul 16,10:32 AM ET

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Around 4% of HIV -positive patients may unknowingly have the bone disorder osteonecrosis, a potentially painful and debilitating condition, new research shows.

The investigators, led by Dr. Joseph A. Kovacs of the National Institutes of Health  in Bethesda, Maryland, did not find any trace of the condition in the study participants who were HIV negative.

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Faith Questioned at AIDS Conference

Sun Jul 14, 2002

By JEROME SOCOLOVSKY, Associated Press Writer

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) - Death has become so much a part of life in southern Africa that church history professor Paul Gundani's face barely bespoke loss as he rattled off the people in his family recently struck down by AIDS .

"My sister last week, and my brother last year," the 42-year-old Roman Catholic theologian said, as though he were lecturing to his class at the University of Zimbabwe. "By now, my nephew may be dead, too."

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With Help, Human Gene Might Block HIV Attack

Mon Jul 15, 2002

By Linda Carroll

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Scientists have discovered a human gene that might be used to defend the body against HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

The gene, CEM15, is part of the body's natural defense against viral infections, researchers report in the July 14th online edition of the journal Nature.

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Africans 'faced with extinction'

Study says AIDS will chop life expectancy below 40 in 11 countries - 27 in

Botswana

July 08, 2002
by Michael Smith
National Post   

BARCELONA - The average life expectancy of people in 11 African countries will drop below 40 by 2010 as HIV/AIDS continues to shorten the lives of millions, U.S. government researchers said in a report to the International AIDS Conference yesterday.

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Senate Passes AIDS Prevention Bill

Fri Jul 12,  2002

By JANELLE CARTER, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) - Billions of dollars would be spent on prevention and treatment programs to battle the international AIDS epidemic under a bill the Senate passed Friday.

The bill, which authorizes almost $5 billion in spending over two years, also would require the United States to develop a five-year plan to reduce significantly the spread of AIDS around the world.

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Timely HIV Treatment the Key to Survival-Study

Fri Jul 12, 2002

LONDON (Reuters) - Too many HIV-infected people are waiting too long to go for treatment either out of fear or ignorance, dramatically cutting their chances of survival, researchers said on Friday.

"It is not a matter of 'the earlier the better,' but there is a definite point of no return where the CD4 white blood cell count has gone too low," research team leader Matthias Egger told Reuters by telephone.

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