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AIDS

Aging face of HIV poses new challenges

8/4/2006

NEW YORK (AP) — Pat Shelton has had the AIDS virus for at least 15 years, and also struggles with hepatitis C and high blood pressure. But what is bothering her most on this sultry summer day are hot flashes.

"I've gone through hell with my menopause," said Shelton, an elegant woman who recently swapped her dreadlocks for a close-cropped look while trying to stay cool. "It's kicking me. But HIV, I've been very blessed. I don't know why."

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Aging face of HIV poses new challenges

8/4/2006

NEW YORK (AP) — Pat Shelton has had the AIDS virus for at least 15 years, and also struggles with hepatitis C and high blood pressure. But what is bothering her most on this sultry summer day are hot flashes.

"I've gone through hell with my menopause," said Shelton, an elegant woman who recently swapped her dreadlocks for a close-cropped look while trying to stay cool. "It's kicking me. But HIV, I've been very blessed. I don't know why."

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HIV/AIDS Therapy Still Effective 10 Years On

08.03.06

THURSDAY, Aug. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Ten years after it was introduced, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) remains very effective at lowering the risk of AIDS and death in people with HIV, a study in this week's issue of The Lancet finds.

However, an increase in tuberculosis (TB) among these patients may be cause for concern, the study said.

HAART, which uses a combination of several antiretroviral drugs, is designed to slow or prevent HIV infection from progressing to AIDS.

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Saving children from AIDS requires involving them

TORONTO -- More child-centred programs are needed to help millions of young people around the world who are unable to protect themselves against the spread of HIV/AIDS because of cultural, economic and social issues that govern their lives, a new report says.

The report by Foster Parents Plan, entitled the Circle of Hope, calls on communities, governments and international aid organizations to focus on helping children and adolescents with programs that address these underlying issues -- and to involve young people in their design and implementation.

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Over 15,000 Canadians have AIDS but don't know it: report

Dennis Bueckert, Canadian Press Published: Tuesday, August 01, 2006

OTTAWA (CP) - More than 15,000 Canadians have HIV-AIDS but don't know it, says a new report by the Public Health Agency of Canada.

The study says about 58,000 people in Canada were living with AIDS last year, and 27 per cent were unaware of their infections, which means they could be unwittingly spreading the virus.

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$287 million to break AIDS vaccine logjam

Gates grants will take science off 'usual' path

By TOM PAULSON
P-I REPORTER

Science "as usual" has become something of an obstacle in the search for an AIDS vaccine, so the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is awarding $287 million over five years to 16 research teams -- four of them in Seattle -- that have agreed to collectively veer off the beaten path.

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FDA approves three-in-one antiretroviral pill

July 13, 2006

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Bristol-Myers Squibb and Gilead Sciences'  three-in-one HIV treatment that’s taken just once daily. Called Atripla, the pill contains 600 milligrams of BMS’s nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor Sustiva, 200 milligrams of Gilead’s nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor Emtriva, and 300 milligrams of Gilead’s nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor Viread. Atripla is the first-ever one-pill, once-daily full antiretroviral regimen approved for use in the United States.

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Circumcision may stop millions of HIV deaths-study

Tue Jul 11, 2006

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Circumcising men routinely across Africa could prevent millions of deaths from AIDS, World Health Organization researchers and colleagues reported on Monday.

They analyzed data from trials that showed men who had been circumcised had a significantly lower risk of infection with the AIDS virus, and calculated that if all men were circumcised over the next 10 years, some two million new infections and around 300,000 deaths could be avoided.

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