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St. John's Wort a Hazard in Transplant Patients

Mon Mar 18, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The evidence is piling up that St. John's wort can be dangerous for organ transplant patients, a British researcher reports.

One way to avoid the problem is for doctors and patients to be more candid about herbal medicine use, according to Dr. E. Ernst of the University of Exeter, UK.

Bleeding Ulcers on the Rise Among British Elderly

Mon Mar 18, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Bleeding ulcers are on the rise among elderly UK patients, British researchers report.

Peptic ulcers are sores or raw areas in the lining of the stomach or the upper portion of the small intestine, known as the duodenum. Up to 15% of people with ulcers will experience bleeding, a serious and in some cases life-threatening complication. Perforation of the stomach or duodenal wall can also occur.

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'Cosmeceuticals' Prove a $5 Billion Sales Wrinkle

Mon Mar 18, 2002

LONDON (Reuters) - Baby boomers are opening their wallets to an increasingly sophisticated array of anti-ageing products, creating a billion-dollar market in so-called "cosmeceuticals," industry experts said on Monday.

Standing on the frontier between cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, cosmeceuticals are sold over-the-counter but have active ingredients like alpha hydroxy acids and vitamins that claim therapeutic benefits.

Selenium deficiency can have serious implications

Studies show that high incidence of cancer has an astonishing correlation to selenium deficiency. Hypothyroidism (low thyroid), premature aging, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, arthritis, cataracts, and hardening of the arteries can all be similarly implicated. Recent research discloses that Selenium is needed to form a key enzyme that converts thyroxin (T4) into triiodothyronine (T3), the major thyroid hormone that makes cell metabolism of nutrients possible. This explains why selenium deficiency can be a cause of hypothyroidism (low thyroid), sluggish metabolism, and obesity.

When C isn't for Cancer

by Institute of Health Sciences, L.L.C.

Every day, we get letters from HSI members and e-Alert readers with questions, comments, and concerns. We get an extraordinary amount of mail, so we can't possibly answer every one personally. But occasionally I'll notice a common thread running through the mail, a question or topic that seems to come up again and again. That's just what I've been seeing lately - and fortunately, I have a powerful answer.

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The Sacred Cow Behind the Elephant

by Contributing Editor: Health Sciences Institute, 3/19/2002

Last week, I saw the same headlines again and again: "Dietary soy reduces pain, inflammation." "A Diet Rich in Soy Products May Help Soothe Pain from Inflammation." Soy has been big news in the health press lately - and all of the coverage I've seen has been positive.

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Beating the gene pool

by Contributing Editor: Health Sciences Institute, 3/20/2002

We've known for over a decade that certain kinds of cancer seem to run in families. In many ways, that knowledge is helpful. But a genetic predisposition to cancer can also leave you feeling doomed.

That is certainly understandable. But more and more, we're learning that a family history doesn't mean your fate is cast in stone. There are many things you can do to mitigate that genetic risk - or even eliminate it completely.

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Beating the gene pool

by Contributing Editor: Health Sciences Institute, 3/20/2002

We've known for over a decade that certain kinds of cancer seem to run in families. In many ways, that knowledge is helpful. But a genetic predisposition to cancer can also leave you feeling doomed.

That is certainly understandable. But more and more, we're learning that a family history doesn't mean your fate is cast in stone. There are many things you can do to mitigate that genetic risk - or even eliminate it completely.

The most accurate predictor of a person'spotential lifespan

by Contributing Editor: Health Sciences Institute, 3/21/2002

If you were asked to name the most accurate predictor of a person's potential lifespan, what would you say?

Smoking habits? Heart health? The presence of disease, like diabetes?

All good guesses. But according to new research, it's none of the above.

The miracle life extension therapy that's totally free

High Relationship Expectations Tied to Depression

Fri Mar 22, 2002

By Merritt McKinney

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Young women who have feelings of depression are more likely to have unreasonable expectations in their personal relationships, researchers in Canada report.

In a study of female college students, women who fit the criteria for dysphoria--a mix of anxiety, depression and irritability--tended to have higher expectations and standards for themselves and others in their personal relationships than women without dysphoria who had never been depressed, the investigators found.

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