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Sweet Taste Boosts Adults' Pain Tolerance

Wed Mar 13, 2002

By Melissa Schorr

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Mary Poppins had it right: a spoonful of sugar does help the medicine go down. According to research presented at the American Psychosomatic Society's annual meeting in Barcelona this week, adults are better able to tolerate pain if they have a bit of sweetness on their tongue.

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A new way to spell relief

Contributing Editor: Health Sciences Institute, 4/3/2002

Far worse than the garden variety indigestion that we all endure every so often, dyspepsia is a chronic stomach pain with no clear cause - and no clear cure. Over the years, there have been many different schools of thought on treating it, and many different treatment approaches, both conventional and alternative. Now, Italian researchers are suggesting another way to treat dyspepsia that may surprise you.

Spicy condiment actually cuts indigestion symptoms in half

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Heredity's Role in Pancreatic Cancer Confirmed

Fri Mar 8, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A study of people with a family history of pancreatic cancer shows them to be at increased risk of developing the disease, according to Canadian researchers.

Dr. Steven A. Narod of the University of Toronto and his colleagues suggest that these first-degree relatives of patients with pancreatic cancer, who are themselves at high risk for the disease, "might benefit from increased surveillance or chemoprevention."

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Gum Chewing Found to Boost Brainpower, Memory

Wed Mar 13, 2002

By Jeremy Laurence

LONDON (Reuters) - The often-maligned act of chewing gum could in fact make us smarter, according to British research.

A joint study carried out by the University of Northumbria and the Cognitive Research Unit, Reading, has found that chewing gum has a positive effect on thinking, memory and other cognitive tasks.

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Fitness Level Found Vital in Men's Death Risk

Wed Mar 13, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The fittest may indeed survive the longest, according to new research suggesting that physical fitness is more important in death risk than even high blood pressure, high cholesterol or smoking.

The study of more than 6,200 US men who underwent treadmill testing for cardiovascular disease found that the risk of death over the next 6 years declined as exercise capacity rose. This was true of both men with cardiovascular disease and those whose exercise tests were normal.

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Study Finds Racial Differences in U.S. Cancer Care

Fri Mar 8, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - US minorities may receive less aggressive cancer treatment than whites--potentially amounting to more cancer recurrences and higher death rates, according to researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

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On-The-Job Paint Exposure Ups Cancer Risk

Wed Mar 13, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men and women in the painting trades or who work in paint manufacturing may have an increased risk of cancer, depending on the job they do, according to the results of a large study conducted in Sweden.

The findings are published in the March issue of the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

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Pediatricians Urge Vision Screening for All Kids

Fri Mar 8, 2002

By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - All children should be screened for amblyopia, or lazy eye, and a new test could help increase vision screening rates, especially in young children, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in a statement released this week.

Monkeys' Minds Used to Move Computer Cursor

Wed Mar 13, 2002

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - US researchers have developed a technology that allows monkeys to move a computer cursor with their minds alone--raising the possibility that a similar system could one day help people with severe paralysis communicate and function more independently.

This stranger-than-fiction science, in which implanted electrodes helped the monkeys' brain activity control the computer-cursor movement, could "potentially be applicable to humans," the study's lead author told Reuters Health.

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