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Naked Chicken Plan May Make Feathers Fly

Mon May 20, 2002

By Megan Goldin

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Chickens could fly even faster to the dinner table if an Israeli geneticist gets his way and develops the featherless fowl.

Avigdor Cahaner, from Israel's Hebrew University, has crossbred a small, bare-skinned bird with a regular boiler chicken as part of a research project to develop succulent, low fat poultry that is environmentally friendly.

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Food Preservative Blamed for Illness

Sun May 19, 2002

YONKERS, N.Y. (AP) - A food preservative was to blame for the sudden outbreak of illness that triggered a chemical-contamination scare in downtown Yonkers, a health official said.

"The food that the family digested was heavily contaminated with sodium nitrite," said Mary Landrigan, spokeswoman for the Westchester County Department of Health. "In that quantity it can be deadly."

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Toxic Contaminants Found in Herbal Supplements

Wednesday, May 16, 2001

Team 7 Investigation Ross McLaughlin

KIRO 7 EYEWITNESS NEWS CONSUMER INVESTIGATOR

Herbs. Many people take them to stay healthy.

But a KIRO 7 Eyewitness News Consumer Investigation exposes dangerous contaminants in some natural products.

You won't see what we discovered listed on the label: Toxic substances that in large enough doses could cause death.

There's something inside this herb.

"It's a bacteria, it's a poison," says Seattle Naturopath Dr. Dan Labrioloa.

WHO to Promote Alternative Medicine

Thu May 16, 2002

By EMMA ROSS, AP Medical Writer

GENEVA (AP) - In response to a rapid increase in the use of alternative medicine over the last decade, the World Health Organization has created the first global strategy for traditional medicine.

The U.N. health agency aims to bring traditional, or alternative, therapies out of the shadows by intensifying research into their effectiveness and safety, by promoting their proper use and regulation and by helping countries integrate them into their health care services.

Pumping Iron May Pump Up Blood Pressure

Fri May 17, 2002

By Serena Gordon
HealthScoutNews Reporter

FRIDAY, May 17 (HealthScoutNews) -- If you want to keep your blood pressure under control, consider skipping the weight room and head to the track or pool instead.

Anaerobic activities like weightlifting do nothing to lower blood pressure, and they also appear to decrease the benefits gained from aerobic exercise in controlling the condition, claims a presentation to be given tomorrow at the annual scientific meeting of the American Society of Hypertension in New York City.

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Tea good for the bones

May 13, 2002

Scientists have come up with yet more evidence of why tea is good for your health - it helps to keep the bones strong. The latest research follows recent studies that suggest the popular beverage can help to reduce the risk of cancer, heart attack and Parkinson's disease.

A team from the National Cheng Kung University Hospital in Tainan, Taiwan, fould that habitual tea drinking over several years preserves bone density in both men and women.

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Neurons keep cells in rhythm

May 16, 2002

by Apoorva Mandavilli,

BioMedNet News

New evidence that neuronal signaling is critical to the function of a circadian clock "challenges" researchers to step outside an individual cell and explore how different components work together to establish an internal rhythm, says a leading researcher in the field. Organisms ranging from fungi, fruit flies and humans have a robust internal clock. Even when cut off from all external stimuli, such as light and temperature, they still exhibit circadian behavior.

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Cuneiform Document Library Hits Web

Fri May 17, 2002

By ANDREW BRIDGES, AP Science Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Historians using the modern language of computers are assembling a virtual library of the earliest known written documents: clay tablets inscribed more than 4,000 years ago.

Begun in 1998, the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative has taken on new urgency. Experts fear if the texts aren't cataloged electronically, they could be lost forever.

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