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HOMELAND HEALTH (Be scared, be very scared)

by Robert Cohen
http://www.notmilk.com

This story is so fantastic that I could not have made it up. This is a prime example of truth being stranger than fiction.

After 9/11, a new agency was established, Homeland Security. Tom Ridge is the director. Their budget is 38 billion dollars. That is not the subject of this column.

Another new agency is in the works, Homeland Health. They even have a website. Curiously, it's a dot.com, not a dot.gov.

http://www.homelandhealth.com

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JUST SAY "NO" TO A PALESTINIAN STATE

May 21, 2002   The widely-held assumption in many foreign, and Israeli, circles that a Palestinian state is the desired solution for the current conflict is increasingly coming under fire.  Arutz-7 presents the following set of excerpts - the first in a series - presenting voices that warn that a PLO state is far from an ideal solution:
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Resistant Bacteria Common in Grocery Store Chicken

Tue May 21, 2002

By Anne Harding

SALT LAKE CITY (Reuters Health) - Most raw chicken on grocery store shelves is contaminated with at least some fecal bacteria, according to the results of an Alabama study presented here Monday.

And most of these bacteria--many of which can make people sick--showed resistance to antibiotics commonly used to treat human illness, Sulaiman G. Gbadamosi and M. Edith Powell of Tuskegee University in Alabama report. They presented their findings at the American Society for Microbiology's annual meeting.

Starving Bacteria of Iron Helps Wipe Out Body Odor

Tue May 21, 2002

By Anne Harding

SALT LAKE CITY (Reuters Health) - Blocking bacteria's supply of iron can keep armpits smelling fresh, researchers reported here Monday.

Body odor doesn't come from sweat, but from bacteria on the skin. So Dr. Andrew Landa and colleagues from the Unilever Research & Development Laboratory in Port Sunlight, UK, have developed a way to starve these bacteria of iron, thus slowing bacterial growth and reducing odor. Landa presented the findings at the American Society for Microbiology's annual meeting.

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UK Urged to Outlaw Obtaining DNA Without Consent

Tue May 21, 2002

By Ed Cropley

LONDON (Reuters) - Britain could be about to introduce tighter genetics laws which would make rummaging through somebody else's dustbin for bits of dental floss or other DNA-besmirched items illegal.

In a move likely to interest millionaire US movie producer and paternity suit battler Steve Bing, the UK's Human Genetics Commission (HGC) asked the government Tuesday to outlaw obtaining somebody's genetic details without their knowledge or consent.

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Legislation to Fight Obesity May Hit Congress Soon

Tue May 21, 2002

By Todd Zwillich

WASHINGTON (Reuters Health) - The US Senate will soon see legislation aimed at reducing skyrocketing levels of obesity in American children and adolescents, lawmakers said Tuesday.

Draft legislation in circulation on Capitol Hill could authorize billions in government spending to encourage increased physical activity and improved nutrition at schools. The proposal is an attempt to help quell the number of obese and overweight children in the US, which has doubled over the last 20 years, they said.

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Lack of Insurance Hurting Americans' Health: Report

Tue May 21, 2002

By Todd Zwillich

WASHINGTON (Reuters Health) - The widespread lack of medical insurance in the US is directly contributing to poorer health and higher rates of early death among adults, according to a report released Tuesday by the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

Groups Defend Direct-To-Consumer Drug Ads

Tue May 21, 2002

By Julie Rovner

WASHINGTON (Reuters Health) - Direct-to-consumer (DTC) prescription drug advertising is not driving up health costs, but could actually be helping to contain them, free-market advocates and others told a Capitol Hill briefing Tuesday.

"Advertising is not simply persuasion. It's not simply arm-twisting. It's also about informing people that something is available," said Tom Giovanetti, president of the Texas-based Institute for Policy Innovation (IPI), which promotes free-market policies.

Pets May Raise Asthma Risk Among Adolescents

Tue May 21, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Having a furry pet in the house may increase an adolescent's risk of developing asthma, new research suggests.

Investigators found that older children and teens with any pet in the home were 60% more likely than others to develop asthma, and the risk was particularly associated with dogs. Kids with humidifiers in the house were also at increased risk, according to findings published in the May issue of Epidemiology.

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