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<b>Heart Problems May Be Cause of Some Seniors' Falls

Heart Problems May Be Cause of Some Seniors' Falls

November 1, 2001 By Charnicia E. Huggins

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Unexplained falls among the elderly may not simply be due to aging. Rather, the falls may be a sign of an unrecognized heart problem, British researchers suggest.

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Age, Poverty Affect Birth Weight More in U.S. Blacks

Age, Poverty Affect Birth Weight More in U.S. Blacks

November 1, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - African-American women are nearly four times as likely as white women to have very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, and this risk is increased as these women age, according to a report.

VLBW infants weigh less than 3.3 pounds at birth. They are less likely to survive, much more likely to be born prematurely, and more likely than infants of normal weight to have developmental problems. Moderately low birth weight (MLBW) infants weigh between 3.3 and 5.5 pounds.

<b>Repeated Concussions Take a Toll on the Brain

Repeated Concussions Take a Toll on the Brain

November 2, 2001 By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Getting back into the game soon after sustaining a concussion could leave athletes vulnerable to further head injury, and potential problems down the road, new research suggests.

<b>Smoking Delays Pregnancy

Smoking Delays Pregnancy

October 31, 2001

LONDON (Reuters Health) - Women who continue smoking while trying to have a baby risk having to wait significantly longer to get pregnant, according to study findings released on Wednesday.

Researchers at the Institute of Health Sciences at Oxford University compared the time taken to conceive by 569 women smokers, ex-smokers and never-smokers.

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Aspirin Reduces Risk of Pregnancy Complication

Aspirin Reduces Risk of Pregnancy Complication

October 31, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Low doses of aspirin appear to reduce the risk of preeclampsia, a life-threatening condition in which blood pressure rises to dangerous levels in pregnant women.

"Based on our findings and the established safety of aspirin...treatment with aspirin in women who are found to have (abnormal ultrasound results) seems reasonable," conclude the authors conclude lead author Dr. Aravinthan Coomarasamy of the Birmingham Women's Hospital in the UK and colleagues.

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Scientists Learn How Lupus Destroys Nervous System

Scientists Learn How Lupus Destroys Nervous System

October 31, 2001 By Merritt McKinney

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Scientists announced on Wednesday that they may have identified how the autoimmune disease lupus destroys the central nervous system. Antibodies produced by the disease seem to kill nerves by latching on to a receptor on neurons, according to a report in the November issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

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Even Slightly High Blood Pressure Poses Health Risk

Even Slightly High Blood Pressure Poses Health Risk

October 31, 2001

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People with blood pressure levels that tend to be slightly elevated but still considered to be within normal ranges--called high-normal--are at increased risk for suffering from heart disease, according to a new study.

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Exercise Maintains Elders' Helpful Angina Response

Exercise Maintains Elders' Helpful Angina Response

November 1, 2001 By Melissa Schorr

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Physical activity may help elderly patients retain a preconditioning response produced prior to a heart attack that seems to offer some protection against death, Italian researchers report.

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Controversy Erupts Over U.S. Vaccine-Liabilities Fund

Controversy Erupts Over U.S. Vaccine-Liabilities Fund

November 1, 2001 By Todd Zwillich

WASHINGTON (Reuters Health) - A federal program designed to compensate families for the adverse effects of vaccines has in some cases become just as contentious as the court cases it was meant to avoid, several witnesses told lawmakers Thursday.

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Brain Uses Dreams to Process Memories

Brain Uses Dreams to Process Memories

November 1, 2000 By Merritt McKinney

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The dreams we have at night often seem full of nonsense, but for the brain, sleep is the time for making sense of much of the information it takes in during waking hours, researchers say.

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