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Planting by the Square

by Robert Cohen

http://www.notmilk.com

I first eliminated milk and dairy products from my diet.

I then stopped eating poultry, fish, and red meat.

These days, I eat a plant-based (vegan) diet.

I buy organic when I can, but that is not always practical. The closer one gets to the source, the healthier and better tasting are the foods. What to do?

Yesterday, I planted my garden. No pesticides. No chemicals. Fertilizer from a friend's farm. She rescues horses.

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15 More Elephants Killed in Kenya; Toll Hits 25 in April

By Jennifer Wanjiru

NAIROBI, Kenya, April 19, 2002 (ENS) - Hit by a fresh wave of poaching, Kenyan authorities have deployed a massive hunt for poachers who this week left 15 elephants dead in the Samburu game reserve. This brings to 25 the number of elephants killed this month in Kenya.

In early April, the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) reported the slaughter of 10 elephants in the expansive Tsavo East National Park by what was described as a "well organized gang of ivory poachers."

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Skin Infections Linked to Nail Salon's Footbaths

Wed May 1, 2002

By Amy Norton

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - An outbreak of severe bacterial skin infections in California has been traced to the footbaths used for pedicures at one nail salon, according to health officials.

They found that all 10 whirlpool footbaths at the salon harbored Mycobacterium fortuitum, which they believe caused furunculosis--a skin disease marked by large boils--in 110 customers.

Same Health Benefits From Less Chocolate: Report

Wed May 1, 2002

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For those of us who took the recent good news that chocolate can be good for the heart as an excuse to eat loads of the sweet stuff, hold on: there's now another encouraging report showing that smaller quantities of chocolate may produce the same beneficial effects, but with fewer calories.

Dark chocolate contains compounds called flavonoids. Previous studies have shown that flavonoids decrease the "stickiness" of platelets, a type of cell that plays a key role in blood clotting.

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Large-Volume Liposuction May Also Improve Health

Wed May 1, 2002

By Kathleen Doheny

LAS VEGAS (Reuters Health) - Removing large volumes of fat via liposuction may not only improve a woman's appearance, but can also improve her health, according to a new report.

"Being overweight is not just unattractive, it's unhealthy," said Dr. Sharon Y. Giese, a New York City aesthetic surgeon who will report Thursday on the health benefits of large-volume liposuction for women at the annual meeting of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery in Las Vegas, Nevada.

Study Supports Idea That Babies Can Count

Thu May 2,2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Babies may be able count long before they learn their numbers, new study findings suggest.

Researchers have speculated that even young infants can enumerate objects, but in some studies it has been unclear whether babies are aware of numbers, per se, or are instead responding to changes in shape and other non-numerical qualities.

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The Earlier the Better for Signed, Spoken Language

Wed May 1, 2002

By Merritt McKinney

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - New research indicates that exposure to some type of language in early infancy--be it spoken or signed--is key to language skills later in life for both deaf and hearing children. The finding suggests that deaf and hearing children who are exposed to spoken or signed language in infancy have an easier time learning a second language later on.

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Mild Depression May Give Elderly Women an Edge

Wed May 1, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Elderly women with mild depression tend to live longer than those without depression, according to findings reported by investigators at Duke University Medical Center.

The findings appear in the May-June issue of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

The 3670 subjects in the study, conducted by Dr. Dan G. Blazer and colleagues in Durham, North Carolina, were 65 years of age or older.

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