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Bilberry

BILBERRY FRUIT

Synonyms: Blueberry, Dwarf Bilberry, Huckleberry, Hurtleberry, Whortleberry

Family: Ericaceae

Genus species: Vaccinium myrtillus

Type: Deciduous Shrub

Part Used: Fruit

Location: Albania, central Europe, former U.S.S.R., former Yugoslavia, northern Europe

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Barley

BARLEY GRASS

Family: Gramineae

Genus species: Hordeum vulgare, Hordeum sativum

Type: Annual grass

Part Used: Young Shoots with flowers in sheath

Location: Temperate Zones

Actions: Antihypercholesterolemic, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiulcer, cancer preventative, digestive, immunoenhancer, improves endurance, laxative, nutritive

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ASTRAGALUS ROOT

ASTRAGALUS ROOT

Synonyms: Astragali Radix, Huang Chi, Huang Qi, Membranous Milk Vetch, Milk Vetch

Family: Fabaceae or Leguminosae

Genus species: Astragalus membranaceus (syn. Astragalus chinensis), Astragalus hoantchy, Astragalus mongholicus, Astragalus adsurgens subsp. fujisanensis, Hedysarum polybotrys

Type: Perennial herb

Part Used: Root

Location: Japan, Korea, Manchuria, Mongolia, northern China

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ALFALFA HERB

Synonyms: Buffalo Herb, Father-of-all-Foods, Lucerne, Purple Medick

Family: Leguminosae or Fabaceae

Genus species: Medicago sativa

Type: Perennial herb

Part Used: Whole herb (aerial parts)

Location: widely cultivated

Synonyms: Buffalo Herb, Father-of-all-Foods, Lucerne, Purple Medick

Family: Leguminosae or Fabaceae

Genus species: Medicago sativa

Type: Perennial herb

Part Used: Whole herb (aerial parts)

Location: widely cultivated

Ayurvedic Remedy Lowers Cholesterol, Study Finds

Thu May 2, 2002

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Correspondent

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A traditional remedy used for 2,500 years in Indian ayurvedic medicine works to lower cholesterol, and in a new way that might lead to the development of improved drugs, researchers said on Thursday.

The resin of guggul, or the myrrh shrub, is used in India to battle obesity, arthritis and artery disease, and is now approved for lowering cholesterol.

Stroke Low on List of Americans' Most-Feared Ills

Thu May 2, 2002

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Americans appear to prefer to keep a blind eye to their own stroke risk even after someone they know has suffered a stroke, according to the results of a new survey conducted by the American Heart Association.

In February of this year, 1,000 US adults were asked which, if any, health threat they most feared. Only 10 respondents (1%) said they feared having a stroke, despite the fact that 35% of those surveyed reported having had a stroke themselves or having a close friend or relative with a recent stroke.

Oriana Fallaci on Anti-Semitism

Panorama, April 18, 2002

Oriana Fallaci, one of Italy's most prominent journalists, has written a powerful polemic on anti-Semitism. It was the cover story in the current issue of Panorama, one of Italy's leading weekly news magazines. The issue came out this past Friday and by Saturday it was virtually sold out. There is much discussion about her article throughout Italy and a great deal of controversy surrounding it. As you will see, she minces no words and takes no prisoners. Some will undoubtedly ask if she is a Jew. She is not.

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More Dietary Folate Lessens Stroke Risk

Thu May 2, 2002

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who get enough folate in their diets seem to have a lower risk of stroke than those who eat fewer folate-rich foods, according to a new report.

The results are based on nutritional surveys of almost 10,000 adults conducted between 1971 and 1975 as part of a nationwide government health survey. The study authors also used medical records and death certificates to assess who amongst those surveyed later suffered stroke or cardiovascular disease.

'Huffing' solvent heads straight for brain's pleasure center

By LEE BOWMAN

April 14, 2002

Scientists using brain-imaging techniques have found that a solvent commonly abused by youngsters behaves much the same as other addictive drugs, heading straight for the region of the brain known to be linked to reward and pleasure.

Images taken of the brains of baboons and mice as they absorbed the solvent toluene found it first hits the same spot as cocaine and other abused drugs before spreading generally to the entire brain and then being rapidly dispersed through the kidneys.

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