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UTSA researcher develops new, non-invasive method to wipe out cancerous tumors

New treatment, requiring only a single dose and a beam of light, can kill up to 95 percent of cancer cells in two hours

Matthew Gdovin, an associate professor in the UTSA Department of Biology, has developed a newly patented method to kill cancer cells. His discovery, described in a new study in The Journal of Clinical Oncology, may tremendously help people with inoperable or hard-to-reach tumors, as well as young children stricken with cancer.

Train Your Brain to use Stress to Your Advantage

It starts off slow. Heart rate building. Dry mouth. A drip of sweat slowly rolling down from your temple to your cheek. And then wham. A punch to the gut.

Stress.

It’s inevitable in life. And yet so many of us see it as something we can’t control. Or worse, something we should bury and ignore.

Keep Calm and Carry On might work for t-shirts and tote bags, but as advice for real life? It’s about as useful as sticking your head in the sand.

You Can Recognize a Heart Attack 1 Month Before it Happens!

Heart attacks are responsible for 25% of all deaths in America. This makes heart attacks the leading cause of death in the country, even outranking cancer.

The major causes of a heart attack are high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the following conditions will add to your risk of having a heart attack:

The MMR Vaccine Continues to be Banned in Japan

For many years, controversy has surrounded the three-in-one vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella. Most notably, the MMR vaccine is infamous for its disputed connection to autism, and despite the fact that it has been blamed in vaccine courts for causing autism, vaccine supporters still deny its fault in skyrocketing rates of autism spectrum disorder, which is at least one in 68 children, with even higher rates of diagnosis among boys.

New Focus Gadget Goes Viral After Early Adopters Report Being Able to “Focus In Like a Laser Beam” On Any Task

If you spend any time on social media then you’ve probably heard about this new focus gadget called the Comfort Cube that has recently went viral. We didn’t know much about it beyond the basics - that is was a small pocketable cube that lets its users beat all forms of attention deficit disorder and stress without taking pills or medication. That was quite a claim. So we set out to dig into the story and the product itself to see what all the hype was about and if the product really did what it’s buyers claimed.

Here’s What Spanking Does to a Child’s Personality

The topic of parenting is a sensitive one, especially when the conversation directs to discipline. One such method of discipline in particular has long been debatable: spanking. While many parents agree on its appropriateness, more and more parents are opting out of this disciplinary action. In fact, in 1979, Sweden was the first country to actually implement spanking as illegal.

Beneficial bacteria linked to a reduced risk of breast cancer

Can probiotics really reduce the risk of breast cancer? The answer may surprise you.

Everyone seems to be talking about the benefits of probiotics these days, and with good reason. They have been linked with health effects like improved digestive and urinary function, a stronger immune system, the healing of IBS and other inflammatory bowel issues plus so much more.

Listening to classical music modulates genes that are responsible for brain functions

Although listening to music is common in all societies, the biological determinants of listening to music are largely unknown. According to a latest study, listening to classical music enhanced the activity of genes involved in dopamine secretion and transport, synaptic neurotransmission, learning and memory, and down-regulated the genes mediating neurodegeneration. Several of the up-regulated genes were known to be responsible for song learning and singing in songbirds, suggesting a common evolutionary background of sound perception across species.