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Rate of deadly, drug-resistant superbug infections at U.S. hospitals surges

By Devon: (NaturalNews) Pharmacies give away antibiotics out their drive-thru window like Tootsie Rolls being tossed out in a parade. Doctors prescribe this candy medicine like it's some kind of all-around wonder drug. When we look at the actual science of antibiotics, they turn out to be less of a healing mechanism and more of a destroyer of the immune system. In fact, antibiotics work by destroying bacteria, both the infectious kind and the protective kind.

The commensal bacteria system of the human body is where most of the human immune system lies. These beneficial bacteria species live symbiotically with the human body and are responsible for aiding digestion, protecting the blood and organs from toxins, and helping the body respond to invading pathogens. Antibiotics trample this beautiful colony of healers working inside the body. Over time, a person who takes antibiotics is more prone to infection and other sickness and disease. This is science, and it can also be easily observed.

As the medical establishment tosses antibiotics around in their parade, they not only destroy the immune system of the population but encourage the rapid evolution of the pathogens they are trying to eradicate. In this fight, nature always wins and superbugs are created in the aftermath. We now see superbug outbreaks occurring in hospitals -- the hotbed of immune-compromised people. A recent outbreak at the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a perfect example of superbugs outsmarting doctors and the antibiotic-zealous medical system. The Los Angeles hospital reported that four patients were infected with the deadly bacteria and that 67 others may also have been exposed.

A similar outbreak occurred at UCLA's Ronald Reagan Medical Center recently. A superbug infection struck seven and took the lives of two just recently. These outbreaks are literally occurring across the country and going under the radar. The deadly bacteria are especially being spread by a kind of throat endoscope used endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures. The FDA is being called upon to issue warnings about the lack of cleanliness of these medical instruments. However, there is little talk about the unnecessary, dangerous and widespread use of antibiotics that is encouraging these deadly bacteria to take hold. The endoscope designers will likely be blamed for scopes that are difficult to clean.

While lack of cleanliness is a problem at some hospitals, there's still a root, systemic problem the medical system tends to ignore: the overprescription of antibiotics and the absolute ignorance of not protecting patients' commensal bacteria systems living in their bodies. There is a sickening lack of education on the importance of strengthening the good bacteria within the human gut.

The resistant superbug taking hold in hospitals is the carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE. Antibiotics can't stop it. They are only encouraging this monster to grow.

"It's just a little late -- especially for those who got infections and maybe died as a consequence," said Lisa McGiffert, director of the Safe Patient Project at Consumers Union.

"It's highly likely many hospitals around the country have had outbreaks, and they haven't been able to connect the dots until this problem was disclosed at UCLA," she said. The superbug has been shown to kill 50 percent of patients.

A large number of people (around a half million in the US) submit to the potentially unclean endoscope each year. It's used on people who can't diagnose their own digestive tract issues and gall bladder problems. The endoscope is threaded down a person's throat to assure patients of an official diagnosis.

By not trusting one's own body signals, by not responding to health issues with the correct food minerals and nutrients to heal the imbalances in the body, people put themselves at the mercy of a medical system that is a peddler of destructive medicine and a diagnosis-happy machine playing with unclean medical instruments.

Sources:

http://www.latimes.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/049185_antibiotic_resistance_superbugs_US_hos...